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The cortisol awakening response: a pilot study on the effects of shift work, morningness and sleep duration.
Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008 Aug; 33(7):981-8.P

Abstract

This study concerned the possible influence of experimental shift work, morningness and sleep length on the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Eight morning-oriented (MT) and eight evening-oriented (ET) healthy young men (19-27 years) slept after three consecutive day shifts during the night and after three consecutive night shifts during the day in the laboratory. Salivary cortisol concentrations were ascertained after each sleep period upon awakening and half an hour later, half-hourly during work shifts, and hourly during two 24-h periods, after the three day shift/night sleep sequences and after the three night shift/day sleep sequences. Statistical analyses considered the temporal position of sleep (night, day), the succession of sleep periods, the diurnal type and the polysomnographically verified total sleep time. The CAR was significantly smaller after day than after night sleep and increased significantly with total sleep time in ET. MT had moderately higher cortisol concentrations upon awakening than ET probably because they wake up at a later time of their circadian rhythm. But neither the CARs nor the cortisol concentrations during the following work shifts or during the 24h profiles were different in both diurnal types. The cortisol concentrations during work shifts correlated significantly with the previous post-awakening concentrations in MT but not in ET. Due to the small samples further studies are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Occupational Physiology at Dortmund University, Ardeystr. 67, D-44139 Dortmund, Germany. griefahn@ifado.deNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18650024

Citation

Griefahn, Barbara, and Sibylle Robens. "The Cortisol Awakening Response: a Pilot Study On the Effects of Shift Work, Morningness and Sleep Duration." Psychoneuroendocrinology, vol. 33, no. 7, 2008, pp. 981-8.
Griefahn B, Robens S. The cortisol awakening response: a pilot study on the effects of shift work, morningness and sleep duration. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008;33(7):981-8.
Griefahn, B., & Robens, S. (2008). The cortisol awakening response: a pilot study on the effects of shift work, morningness and sleep duration. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 33(7), 981-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2008.04.004
Griefahn B, Robens S. The Cortisol Awakening Response: a Pilot Study On the Effects of Shift Work, Morningness and Sleep Duration. Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2008;33(7):981-8. PubMed PMID: 18650024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The cortisol awakening response: a pilot study on the effects of shift work, morningness and sleep duration. AU - Griefahn,Barbara, AU - Robens,Sibylle, Y1 - 2008/07/22/ PY - 2007/08/14/received PY - 2008/03/14/revised PY - 2008/04/22/accepted PY - 2008/7/25/pubmed PY - 2008/11/14/medline PY - 2008/7/25/entrez SP - 981 EP - 8 JF - Psychoneuroendocrinology JO - Psychoneuroendocrinology VL - 33 IS - 7 N2 - This study concerned the possible influence of experimental shift work, morningness and sleep length on the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Eight morning-oriented (MT) and eight evening-oriented (ET) healthy young men (19-27 years) slept after three consecutive day shifts during the night and after three consecutive night shifts during the day in the laboratory. Salivary cortisol concentrations were ascertained after each sleep period upon awakening and half an hour later, half-hourly during work shifts, and hourly during two 24-h periods, after the three day shift/night sleep sequences and after the three night shift/day sleep sequences. Statistical analyses considered the temporal position of sleep (night, day), the succession of sleep periods, the diurnal type and the polysomnographically verified total sleep time. The CAR was significantly smaller after day than after night sleep and increased significantly with total sleep time in ET. MT had moderately higher cortisol concentrations upon awakening than ET probably because they wake up at a later time of their circadian rhythm. But neither the CARs nor the cortisol concentrations during the following work shifts or during the 24h profiles were different in both diurnal types. The cortisol concentrations during work shifts correlated significantly with the previous post-awakening concentrations in MT but not in ET. Due to the small samples further studies are needed. SN - 0306-4530 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18650024/The_cortisol_awakening_response:_a_pilot_study_on_the_effects_of_shift_work_morningness_and_sleep_duration_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0306-4530(08)00105-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -