Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Telephone counseling promotes dietary change in healthy adults: results of a pilot trial.
J Am Diet Assoc 2008; 108(8):1350-4JA

Abstract

Telephone counseling is increasingly reported to be an effective behavior change strategy, but more studies in broader populations are needed. This uncontrolled pilot trial investigated whether a 3-month/eight-call telephone counseling intervention could promote dietary changes associated with reduced chronic disease risk in adults consuming <5.0 servings of vegetables and fruits daily. Between 2002 and 2004, 97 adults (mean age 46 years; range 21 to 84 years) completed the intervention and a follow-up assessment at 6 months. Approximately half were of nonwhite ethnicity (53%). The majority were women (95%) and had never had cancer (89%). The intervention promoted daily intakes of three to five vegetable servings, two to four fruit servings, and three whole-grain and/or beans/legumes servings. Average total daily intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans/legumes, fiber, and fat were assessed at baseline and at 6 months, each by a set of three 24-hour recalls. Plasma carotenoids were measured on a subsample (n=41) as an objective biomarker of vegetable and fruit intake. Change in mean self-reported dietary intake (ie, vegetables, fruit, whole grains, beans/legumes, fiber, and fat) and plasma carotenoids were compared by paired t tests. The intervention was associated with a significant (P<0.001) increase in vegetable servings per day (baseline 2.1 servings per day, 6 months 3.5 servings per day; 67% increase), fruit servings per day (baseline 1.4 servings per day, 6 months 2.4 servings per day; 71% increase), and whole-grain and/or bean servings per day (baseline 1.0 serving per day, 6 months 1.4 servings per day; 40% increase). These changes were corroborated by a significant (P<0.001) increase in total plasma carotenoids. This 3-month/eight-call telephone counseling intervention was associated with dietary change in healthy adults consuming fewer than five servings per day of vegetables and fruit at study entry.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0901, USA. vinewman@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18656575

Citation

Newman, Vicky A., et al. "Telephone Counseling Promotes Dietary Change in Healthy Adults: Results of a Pilot Trial." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 108, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1350-4.
Newman VA, Flatt SW, Pierce JP. Telephone counseling promotes dietary change in healthy adults: results of a pilot trial. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108(8):1350-4.
Newman, V. A., Flatt, S. W., & Pierce, J. P. (2008). Telephone counseling promotes dietary change in healthy adults: results of a pilot trial. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 108(8), pp. 1350-4. doi:10.1016/j.jada.2008.05.007.
Newman VA, Flatt SW, Pierce JP. Telephone Counseling Promotes Dietary Change in Healthy Adults: Results of a Pilot Trial. J Am Diet Assoc. 2008;108(8):1350-4. PubMed PMID: 18656575.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Telephone counseling promotes dietary change in healthy adults: results of a pilot trial. AU - Newman,Vicky A, AU - Flatt,Shirley W, AU - Pierce,John P, PY - 2007/03/29/received PY - 2008/01/18/accepted PY - 2008/7/29/pubmed PY - 2008/9/10/medline PY - 2008/7/29/entrez SP - 1350 EP - 4 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 108 IS - 8 N2 - Telephone counseling is increasingly reported to be an effective behavior change strategy, but more studies in broader populations are needed. This uncontrolled pilot trial investigated whether a 3-month/eight-call telephone counseling intervention could promote dietary changes associated with reduced chronic disease risk in adults consuming <5.0 servings of vegetables and fruits daily. Between 2002 and 2004, 97 adults (mean age 46 years; range 21 to 84 years) completed the intervention and a follow-up assessment at 6 months. Approximately half were of nonwhite ethnicity (53%). The majority were women (95%) and had never had cancer (89%). The intervention promoted daily intakes of three to five vegetable servings, two to four fruit servings, and three whole-grain and/or beans/legumes servings. Average total daily intake of vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans/legumes, fiber, and fat were assessed at baseline and at 6 months, each by a set of three 24-hour recalls. Plasma carotenoids were measured on a subsample (n=41) as an objective biomarker of vegetable and fruit intake. Change in mean self-reported dietary intake (ie, vegetables, fruit, whole grains, beans/legumes, fiber, and fat) and plasma carotenoids were compared by paired t tests. The intervention was associated with a significant (P<0.001) increase in vegetable servings per day (baseline 2.1 servings per day, 6 months 3.5 servings per day; 67% increase), fruit servings per day (baseline 1.4 servings per day, 6 months 2.4 servings per day; 71% increase), and whole-grain and/or bean servings per day (baseline 1.0 serving per day, 6 months 1.4 servings per day; 40% increase). These changes were corroborated by a significant (P<0.001) increase in total plasma carotenoids. This 3-month/eight-call telephone counseling intervention was associated with dietary change in healthy adults consuming fewer than five servings per day of vegetables and fruit at study entry. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18656575/Telephone_counseling_promotes_dietary_change_in_healthy_adults:_results_of_a_pilot_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(08)00658-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -