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Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections: the association between age and mortality and functional status.
J Am Geriatr Soc 2008; 56(8):1485-9JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the association between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) blood stream infections (BSIs) and morbidity and mortality in older adults.

DESIGN

Retrospective review.

SETTING

Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System.

PARTICIPANTS

All patients with S. aureus BSI during 2004/05.

MEASUREMENTS

Outcomes included in-hospital and 6-month mortality, as well as need for subacute care.

RESULTS

Sixty-eight patients with S. aureus BSI were identified (mean age 63.5+/-13.0). Outcomes of interest included in-hospital mortality (19.1%), 6-month mortality (33.8%), and need for subacute care (65.4%). Univariate analysis identified several predictors of death, including older age, chronic renal insufficiency, catheter-related infection, Charlson weighted index of comorbidity score, and infection with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that older age (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P<.01), chronic renal insufficiency (OR=16.6, P=.01), and MRSA infection (OR=5.1, P=.03) were independently associated with 6-month mortality. These results suggest that, for every decade increase in age, the odds of death within 6 months of S. aureus BSI doubles (OR=1.1). Chronic renal insufficiency was also independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Of the previously community-dwelling patients (n=50), 41 survived hospitalization, of whom 22 (53.7%) required subacute care after discharge.

CONCLUSION

Better understanding of the epidemiology of S. aureus BSI in older patients and validation of risk factors for poor functional outcomes and death should be the focus of future prospective studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious , Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Healthcare System, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105, USA. pmalani@umich.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18662207

Citation

Malani, Preeti N., et al. "Staphylococcus Aureus Bloodstream Infections: the Association Between Age and Mortality and Functional Status." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 56, no. 8, 2008, pp. 1485-9.
Malani PN, Rana MM, Banerjee M, et al. Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections: the association between age and mortality and functional status. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(8):1485-9.
Malani, P. N., Rana, M. M., Banerjee, M., & Bradley, S. F. (2008). Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections: the association between age and mortality and functional status. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56(8), pp. 1485-9. doi:10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01823.x.
Malani PN, et al. Staphylococcus Aureus Bloodstream Infections: the Association Between Age and Mortality and Functional Status. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(8):1485-9. PubMed PMID: 18662207.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections: the association between age and mortality and functional status. AU - Malani,Preeti N, AU - Rana,Meenakshi M, AU - Banerjee,Mousumi, AU - Bradley,Suzanne F, Y1 - 2008/07/24/ PY - 2008/7/30/pubmed PY - 2008/10/7/medline PY - 2008/7/30/entrez SP - 1485 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 56 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) blood stream infections (BSIs) and morbidity and mortality in older adults. DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Veterans Affairs Ann Arbor Healthcare System. PARTICIPANTS: All patients with S. aureus BSI during 2004/05. MEASUREMENTS: Outcomes included in-hospital and 6-month mortality, as well as need for subacute care. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients with S. aureus BSI were identified (mean age 63.5+/-13.0). Outcomes of interest included in-hospital mortality (19.1%), 6-month mortality (33.8%), and need for subacute care (65.4%). Univariate analysis identified several predictors of death, including older age, chronic renal insufficiency, catheter-related infection, Charlson weighted index of comorbidity score, and infection with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Multivariable analysis demonstrated that older age (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P<.01), chronic renal insufficiency (OR=16.6, P=.01), and MRSA infection (OR=5.1, P=.03) were independently associated with 6-month mortality. These results suggest that, for every decade increase in age, the odds of death within 6 months of S. aureus BSI doubles (OR=1.1). Chronic renal insufficiency was also independently associated with in-hospital mortality. Of the previously community-dwelling patients (n=50), 41 survived hospitalization, of whom 22 (53.7%) required subacute care after discharge. CONCLUSION: Better understanding of the epidemiology of S. aureus BSI in older patients and validation of risk factors for poor functional outcomes and death should be the focus of future prospective studies. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18662207/Staphylococcus_aureus_bloodstream_infections:_the_association_between_age_and_mortality_and_functional_status_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01823.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -