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Work stress inventory for dental assistants: development and psychometric evaluation.
J Public Health Dent. 2009 Winter; 69(1):56-61.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The purposes of this study were to develop a work stress inventory for dental assistants (WSI-DA) in Jordan and examine its psychometric properties and to describe potentially stressful work-related conditions related to the profession of dental assistance in Jordan.

METHODS

A total of 542 dental assistants working in private dental clinics in Jordan participated in this study. The stages of instrument development included selecting an initial item pool, choosing the best items, deciding on the questionnaire format, pretesting the instrument, and determining its reliability and validity. An initial set of 55 items was selected and categorized into nine hypothetical categories. Further testing and using factor analysis ended with a 35-item, nine-scale instrument. The raw score for each scale was calculated by adding the responses for individual items and then transformed to 0-100 scales. The item-level validity, item internal consistency, item discriminant validity, and Cronbach's alpha were assessed.

RESULTS

Nine factors had eigenvalues greater than one. The nine factors accounted for 78.7 percent of the total variability in the 35-item questionnaire. All item-scale correlations were greater than the recommended correlation of 0.40. Except patient's suffer scale (Cronbach's alpha = 0.56), all other scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha exceeding the minimum standard of 0.7 and ranging from 0.71 to 0.87. Test-retest reliability showed acceptable reliability in all nine scales and ranged from 0.61 to 0.92.

CONCLUSIONS

The 35-item, nine-scale WSI-DA demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability when used among dental assistants in Jordan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Public Health and Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jordan University of Science & Technology, Irbid 22110, Jordan. yousef.k@excite.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18662250

Citation

Khader, Yousef S., et al. "Work Stress Inventory for Dental Assistants: Development and Psychometric Evaluation." Journal of Public Health Dentistry, vol. 69, no. 1, 2009, pp. 56-61.
Khader YS, Airan DM, Al-Faouri I. Work stress inventory for dental assistants: development and psychometric evaluation. J Public Health Dent. 2009;69(1):56-61.
Khader, Y. S., Airan, D. M., & Al-Faouri, I. (2009). Work stress inventory for dental assistants: development and psychometric evaluation. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 69(1), 56-61. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-7325.2008.00094.x
Khader YS, Airan DM, Al-Faouri I. Work Stress Inventory for Dental Assistants: Development and Psychometric Evaluation. J Public Health Dent. 2009;69(1):56-61. PubMed PMID: 18662250.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Work stress inventory for dental assistants: development and psychometric evaluation. AU - Khader,Yousef S, AU - Airan,Dana M, AU - Al-Faouri,Ibrahim, PY - 2008/7/30/pubmed PY - 2009/8/26/medline PY - 2008/7/30/entrez SP - 56 EP - 61 JF - Journal of public health dentistry JO - J Public Health Dent VL - 69 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The purposes of this study were to develop a work stress inventory for dental assistants (WSI-DA) in Jordan and examine its psychometric properties and to describe potentially stressful work-related conditions related to the profession of dental assistance in Jordan. METHODS: A total of 542 dental assistants working in private dental clinics in Jordan participated in this study. The stages of instrument development included selecting an initial item pool, choosing the best items, deciding on the questionnaire format, pretesting the instrument, and determining its reliability and validity. An initial set of 55 items was selected and categorized into nine hypothetical categories. Further testing and using factor analysis ended with a 35-item, nine-scale instrument. The raw score for each scale was calculated by adding the responses for individual items and then transformed to 0-100 scales. The item-level validity, item internal consistency, item discriminant validity, and Cronbach's alpha were assessed. RESULTS: Nine factors had eigenvalues greater than one. The nine factors accounted for 78.7 percent of the total variability in the 35-item questionnaire. All item-scale correlations were greater than the recommended correlation of 0.40. Except patient's suffer scale (Cronbach's alpha = 0.56), all other scales demonstrated acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha exceeding the minimum standard of 0.7 and ranging from 0.71 to 0.87. Test-retest reliability showed acceptable reliability in all nine scales and ranged from 0.61 to 0.92. CONCLUSIONS: The 35-item, nine-scale WSI-DA demonstrated acceptable validity and reliability when used among dental assistants in Jordan. SN - 0022-4006 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18662250/Work_stress_inventory_for_dental_assistants:_development_and_psychometric_evaluation_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1752-7325.2008.00094.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -