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Self-reported disciplinary practices among women in the child welfare system: association with domestic violence victimization.
Child Abuse Negl. 2008 Aug; 32(8):811-8.CA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the association between physical domestic violence victimization (both recent and more than a year in past measured by self-report) and self-reported disciplinary practices among female parents/caregivers in a national sample of families referred to child welfare.

METHODS

Cross-sectional survey of more than 3,000 female caregivers in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW) study, a nationally representative sample of children and their families referred to child welfare agencies for investigation of abuse and neglect. Women reported physical domestic violence victimization and their disciplinary practices for their child on different versions of the Conflict Tactics Scales.

RESULTS

Four hundred and forty-three women reported prior year domestic violence, 1,161 reported domestic violence but not in the past 12 months, and 2,025 reported no domestic violence exposure. Any prior domestic violence exposure was associated with higher rates of self-reported psychological aggression, physical aggression and neglectful disciplinary behaviors as compared to those with no domestic violence victimization in bivariate comparisons. After controlling for child behavior, demographic factors, and maternal characteristics, those with remote and recent domestic violence victimization employed more self-reported psychological aggression, while only caregivers with recent DV reported more physical aggression or neglectful behaviors.

CONCLUSIONS

In a national child welfare sample, self-reported aggressive and neglectful parenting behaviors were common. In this sample, domestic violence victimization is associated with more self-reported aggressive and neglectful disciplinary behaviors among female caregivers. The mechanism for these associations is not clear.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

Rates of aggressive and neglectful disciplinary practices are especially high among female parents/caregivers exposed to domestic violence. Child welfare agencies should plan routine and structured assessments for domestic violence among parents/caregivers and implement parenting interventions to reduce harmful disciplinary practices for those families identified.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Ohio State University, Department of Pediatrics, Columbus, OH 43205, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18667237

Citation

Kelleher, Kelly J., et al. "Self-reported Disciplinary Practices Among Women in the Child Welfare System: Association With Domestic Violence Victimization." Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 32, no. 8, 2008, pp. 811-8.
Kelleher KJ, Hazen AL, Coben JH, et al. Self-reported disciplinary practices among women in the child welfare system: association with domestic violence victimization. Child Abuse Negl. 2008;32(8):811-8.
Kelleher, K. J., Hazen, A. L., Coben, J. H., Wang, Y., McGeehan, J., Kohl, P. L., & Gardner, W. P. (2008). Self-reported disciplinary practices among women in the child welfare system: association with domestic violence victimization. Child Abuse & Neglect, 32(8), 811-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chiabu.2007.12.004
Kelleher KJ, et al. Self-reported Disciplinary Practices Among Women in the Child Welfare System: Association With Domestic Violence Victimization. Child Abuse Negl. 2008;32(8):811-8. PubMed PMID: 18667237.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-reported disciplinary practices among women in the child welfare system: association with domestic violence victimization. AU - Kelleher,Kelly J, AU - Hazen,Andrea L, AU - Coben,Jeffrey H, AU - Wang,Yun, AU - McGeehan,Jennifer, AU - Kohl,Patricia L, AU - Gardner,William P, Y1 - 2008/07/29/ PY - 2006/10/10/received PY - 2007/12/11/revised PY - 2007/12/23/accepted PY - 2008/8/1/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/8/1/entrez SP - 811 EP - 8 JF - Child abuse & neglect JO - Child Abuse Negl VL - 32 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between physical domestic violence victimization (both recent and more than a year in past measured by self-report) and self-reported disciplinary practices among female parents/caregivers in a national sample of families referred to child welfare. METHODS: Cross-sectional survey of more than 3,000 female caregivers in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW) study, a nationally representative sample of children and their families referred to child welfare agencies for investigation of abuse and neglect. Women reported physical domestic violence victimization and their disciplinary practices for their child on different versions of the Conflict Tactics Scales. RESULTS: Four hundred and forty-three women reported prior year domestic violence, 1,161 reported domestic violence but not in the past 12 months, and 2,025 reported no domestic violence exposure. Any prior domestic violence exposure was associated with higher rates of self-reported psychological aggression, physical aggression and neglectful disciplinary behaviors as compared to those with no domestic violence victimization in bivariate comparisons. After controlling for child behavior, demographic factors, and maternal characteristics, those with remote and recent domestic violence victimization employed more self-reported psychological aggression, while only caregivers with recent DV reported more physical aggression or neglectful behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: In a national child welfare sample, self-reported aggressive and neglectful parenting behaviors were common. In this sample, domestic violence victimization is associated with more self-reported aggressive and neglectful disciplinary behaviors among female caregivers. The mechanism for these associations is not clear. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Rates of aggressive and neglectful disciplinary practices are especially high among female parents/caregivers exposed to domestic violence. Child welfare agencies should plan routine and structured assessments for domestic violence among parents/caregivers and implement parenting interventions to reduce harmful disciplinary practices for those families identified. SN - 0145-2134 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18667237/Self_reported_disciplinary_practices_among_women_in_the_child_welfare_system:_association_with_domestic_violence_victimization_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0145-2134(08)00118-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -