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Red meat consumption during adolescence among premenopausal women and risk of breast cancer.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008; 17(8):2146-51CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adolescence may be a period of increased susceptibility to breast cancer due to regular division of undifferentiated cells that occurs between puberty and first birth. Red meat consumption during early adult life has been associated with breast cancer, but intake during adolescence has not been examined prospectively. We aimed to assess the relationship between red meat intake during adolescence and premenopausal breast cancer.

METHODS

We examined the incidence of invasive premenopausal breast cancer prospectively within the Nurses' Health Study II. A total of 39,268 premenopausal women who completed a validated 124-item food frequency questionnaire on their diet during high school, were followed for 7 years, from 1998 to 2005. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI).

RESULTS

455 cases of invasive premenopausal breast cancer were diagnosed between 1998 and 2005. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of red meat intake during high school, the multivariate-adjusted RR for the highest quintile of intake was 1.34 (95% CI, 0.94-1.89; P(trend) = 0.05). A significant linear association was observed with every additional 100 g of red meat consumed per day (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.00-1.43; P = 0.05). This association was more pronounced in hormone receptor-positive tumors (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.08-1.70; P = 0.008) and was not significant in hormone receptor-negative tumors (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.61-1.61, P = 0.97).

CONCLUSION

Higher red meat intake in adolescence may increase the risk of premenopausal breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. elinos@hsph.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18669582

Citation

Linos, Eleni, et al. "Red Meat Consumption During Adolescence Among Premenopausal Women and Risk of Breast Cancer." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 17, no. 8, 2008, pp. 2146-51.
Linos E, Willett WC, Cho E, et al. Red meat consumption during adolescence among premenopausal women and risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008;17(8):2146-51.
Linos, E., Willett, W. C., Cho, E., Colditz, G., & Frazier, L. A. (2008). Red meat consumption during adolescence among premenopausal women and risk of breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 17(8), pp. 2146-51. doi:10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-08-0037.
Linos E, et al. Red Meat Consumption During Adolescence Among Premenopausal Women and Risk of Breast Cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2008;17(8):2146-51. PubMed PMID: 18669582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Red meat consumption during adolescence among premenopausal women and risk of breast cancer. AU - Linos,Eleni, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Cho,Eunyoung, AU - Colditz,Graham, AU - Frazier,Lindsay A, Y1 - 2008/07/31/ PY - 2008/8/2/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/8/2/entrez SP - 2146 EP - 51 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 17 IS - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adolescence may be a period of increased susceptibility to breast cancer due to regular division of undifferentiated cells that occurs between puberty and first birth. Red meat consumption during early adult life has been associated with breast cancer, but intake during adolescence has not been examined prospectively. We aimed to assess the relationship between red meat intake during adolescence and premenopausal breast cancer. METHODS: We examined the incidence of invasive premenopausal breast cancer prospectively within the Nurses' Health Study II. A total of 39,268 premenopausal women who completed a validated 124-item food frequency questionnaire on their diet during high school, were followed for 7 years, from 1998 to 2005. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). RESULTS: 455 cases of invasive premenopausal breast cancer were diagnosed between 1998 and 2005. Compared with women in the lowest quintile of red meat intake during high school, the multivariate-adjusted RR for the highest quintile of intake was 1.34 (95% CI, 0.94-1.89; P(trend) = 0.05). A significant linear association was observed with every additional 100 g of red meat consumed per day (RR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.00-1.43; P = 0.05). This association was more pronounced in hormone receptor-positive tumors (RR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.08-1.70; P = 0.008) and was not significant in hormone receptor-negative tumors (RR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.61-1.61, P = 0.97). CONCLUSION: Higher red meat intake in adolescence may increase the risk of premenopausal breast cancer. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18669582/Red_meat_consumption_during_adolescence_among_premenopausal_women_and_risk_of_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18669582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -