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An association between metabolic syndrome and the estimated glomerular filtration rate.
Intern Med. 2008; 47(15):1399-406.IM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a major public health problem. However, few studies have examined the significance of MetS as a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general Japanese population.

METHODS

Study participants without a clinical history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, angina, or renal failure (1,158 men, aged 61+/-15 years and 1,606 women, aged 63+/-12 years) were recruited from a single community. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between MetS and renal function as evaluated by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR).

RESULTS

The presence of MetS was consistently associated with reduced eGFR, with the level of reduction proportional to the number of MetS components present. Multiple linear regression analysis using eGFR as an objective variable showed that BMI, DBP, antihypertensive drug use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, antilipidemic drug use and fasting blood glucose, which were components of MetS, were significantly and independently associated with eGFR, in addition to age and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Individuals with MetS showed a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.13) for CKD compared to those without MetS.

CONCLUSIONS

MetS was significantly associated with decreased eGFR in the general population.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Nomura Municipal Hospital, Seiyo. rykawamo@ehime.med.or.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18670145

Citation

Kawamoto, Ryuichi, et al. "An Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and the Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate." Internal Medicine (Tokyo, Japan), vol. 47, no. 15, 2008, pp. 1399-406.
Kawamoto R, Kohara K, Tabara Y, et al. An association between metabolic syndrome and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Intern Med. 2008;47(15):1399-406.
Kawamoto, R., Kohara, K., Tabara, Y., & Miki, T. (2008). An association between metabolic syndrome and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. Internal Medicine (Tokyo, Japan), 47(15), 1399-406.
Kawamoto R, et al. An Association Between Metabolic Syndrome and the Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate. Intern Med. 2008;47(15):1399-406. PubMed PMID: 18670145.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An association between metabolic syndrome and the estimated glomerular filtration rate. AU - Kawamoto,Ryuichi, AU - Kohara,Katsuhiko, AU - Tabara,Yasuharu, AU - Miki,Tetsuro, Y1 - 2008/08/01/ PY - 2008/8/2/pubmed PY - 2008/10/16/medline PY - 2008/8/2/entrez SP - 1399 EP - 406 JF - Internal medicine (Tokyo, Japan) JO - Intern Med VL - 47 IS - 15 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a major public health problem. However, few studies have examined the significance of MetS as a risk factor for the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the general Japanese population. METHODS: Study participants without a clinical history of stroke, transient ischemic attack, myocardial infarction, angina, or renal failure (1,158 men, aged 61+/-15 years and 1,606 women, aged 63+/-12 years) were recruited from a single community. We examined the cross-sectional relationship between MetS and renal function as evaluated by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). RESULTS: The presence of MetS was consistently associated with reduced eGFR, with the level of reduction proportional to the number of MetS components present. Multiple linear regression analysis using eGFR as an objective variable showed that BMI, DBP, antihypertensive drug use, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, antilipidemic drug use and fasting blood glucose, which were components of MetS, were significantly and independently associated with eGFR, in addition to age and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Individuals with MetS showed a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio of 1.53 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-2.13) for CKD compared to those without MetS. CONCLUSIONS: MetS was significantly associated with decreased eGFR in the general population. SN - 1349-7235 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18670145/An_association_between_metabolic_syndrome_and_the_estimated_glomerular_filtration_rate_ L2 - https://joi.jlc.jst.go.jp/JST.JSTAGE/internalmedicine/47.1202?from=PubMed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -