Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Zinc supplementation decreases oxidative stress, incidence of infection, and generation of inflammatory cytokines in sickle cell disease patients.
Transl Res. 2008 Aug; 152(2):67-80.TR

Abstract

Zinc deficiency is common in adult sickle-cell disease (SCD) patients. We previously demonstrated that zinc supplementation to adult SCD patients decreased the incidences of infections and hospital admissions. We hypothesize that zinc supplementation improves T-helper cell function and decreases vascular endothelial cell activation, oxidative stress, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB)-DNA binding in mononuclear cells (MNCs) in SCD patients. To test this hypothesis, 36 SCD patients were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups. One group (n = 18) received 25-mg zinc orally thrice a day for 3 months. The other group (n = 18) received placebo. The results indicate that the zinc-supplemented group had decreased incidence of infections compared with the placebo group. After zinc supplementation, red blood cell, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, (Hct), plasma zinc, and antioxidant power increased; plasma nitrite and nitrate (NOx), lipid peroxidation products, DNA oxidation products, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 decreased in the zinc-supplemented group, compared with the placebo group. Zinc-supplemented patients exhibited significant decreases in lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1beta mRNAs, and TNF-induced nuclear factor of kappaB-DNA binding in MNCs, compared with the placebo group. Ex vivo addition of zinc to MNCs isolated from the placebo subjects decreased TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNAs. Zinc supplementation also increased relative levels of IL-2 and IL-2Ralpha mRNAs in phytohemagglutinin-p-stimulated MNCs. These results suggest that zinc supplementation may be beneficial to SCD patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201, USA. bbao@med.wayne.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18674741

Citation

Bao, Bin, et al. "Zinc Supplementation Decreases Oxidative Stress, Incidence of Infection, and Generation of Inflammatory Cytokines in Sickle Cell Disease Patients." Translational Research : the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, vol. 152, no. 2, 2008, pp. 67-80.
Bao B, Prasad AS, Beck FW, et al. Zinc supplementation decreases oxidative stress, incidence of infection, and generation of inflammatory cytokines in sickle cell disease patients. Transl Res. 2008;152(2):67-80.
Bao, B., Prasad, A. S., Beck, F. W., Snell, D., Suneja, A., Sarkar, F. H., Doshi, N., Fitzgerald, J. T., & Swerdlow, P. (2008). Zinc supplementation decreases oxidative stress, incidence of infection, and generation of inflammatory cytokines in sickle cell disease patients. Translational Research : the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, 152(2), 67-80. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trsl.2008.06.001
Bao B, et al. Zinc Supplementation Decreases Oxidative Stress, Incidence of Infection, and Generation of Inflammatory Cytokines in Sickle Cell Disease Patients. Transl Res. 2008;152(2):67-80. PubMed PMID: 18674741.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Zinc supplementation decreases oxidative stress, incidence of infection, and generation of inflammatory cytokines in sickle cell disease patients. AU - Bao,Bin, AU - Prasad,Ananda S, AU - Beck,Frances W J, AU - Snell,Diane, AU - Suneja,Anupam, AU - Sarkar,Fazlul H, AU - Doshi,Nimisha, AU - Fitzgerald,James T, AU - Swerdlow,Paul, Y1 - 2008/07/11/ PY - 2008/02/07/received PY - 2008/06/02/revised PY - 2008/06/04/accepted PY - 2008/8/5/pubmed PY - 2008/9/18/medline PY - 2008/8/5/entrez SP - 67 EP - 80 JF - Translational research : the journal of laboratory and clinical medicine JO - Transl Res VL - 152 IS - 2 N2 - Zinc deficiency is common in adult sickle-cell disease (SCD) patients. We previously demonstrated that zinc supplementation to adult SCD patients decreased the incidences of infections and hospital admissions. We hypothesize that zinc supplementation improves T-helper cell function and decreases vascular endothelial cell activation, oxidative stress, and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB)-DNA binding in mononuclear cells (MNCs) in SCD patients. To test this hypothesis, 36 SCD patients were recruited and randomly divided into 2 groups. One group (n = 18) received 25-mg zinc orally thrice a day for 3 months. The other group (n = 18) received placebo. The results indicate that the zinc-supplemented group had decreased incidence of infections compared with the placebo group. After zinc supplementation, red blood cell, hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit, (Hct), plasma zinc, and antioxidant power increased; plasma nitrite and nitrate (NOx), lipid peroxidation products, DNA oxidation products, and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 decreased in the zinc-supplemented group, compared with the placebo group. Zinc-supplemented patients exhibited significant decreases in lipopolysaccharide-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-1beta mRNAs, and TNF-induced nuclear factor of kappaB-DNA binding in MNCs, compared with the placebo group. Ex vivo addition of zinc to MNCs isolated from the placebo subjects decreased TNF-alpha and IL-1beta mRNAs. Zinc supplementation also increased relative levels of IL-2 and IL-2Ralpha mRNAs in phytohemagglutinin-p-stimulated MNCs. These results suggest that zinc supplementation may be beneficial to SCD patients. SN - 1931-5244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18674741/Zinc_supplementation_decreases_oxidative_stress_incidence_of_infection_and_generation_of_inflammatory_cytokines_in_sickle_cell_disease_patients_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1931-5244(08)00157-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -