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Inhibition of chemically induced inflammation and pain by orally and topically administered leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz in rodents.
J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Sep 02; 119(1):6-11.JE

Abstract

The aqueous leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz (MELE) is being used orally and topically in traditional African medicine for the treatment of inflammation and pain, and claimed to be safe. The anti-inflammatory effects of MELE (100-400 mg/kg, p.o. or 1-4%, w/w in petroleum jelly, topically) were tested against carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats as well as against xylene-induced ear oedema in mice. The analgesic effect of MELE (100-400 mg/kg, p.o. or 1-4%, w/w in petroleum jelly, topically) was tested against acetic acid-induced (20 microl, 0.6%, v/v in normal saline, i.p.) and acetylcholine-induced (8.3 mg/kg, i.p.) mouse writhing models. At 100-400 mg/kg, p.o. and 1-4% (w/w), topically, MELE produced significant inhibitions of carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and xylene-induced ear swelling in mice. Effects produced by MELE were significantly higher than those produced by indomethacin (10 mg/kg, s.c. or 1%, w/w in petroleum jelly) in the anti-inflammatory models. For the analgesic effect, MELE (100-400 mg/kg, orally) and (1-4%, w/w, topically), like aspirin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited significant (P<0.05) inhibition of acetic acid- and acetylcholine-induced mouse writhing tests, compared to untreated control. Effects produced by MELE were significantly lower than those produced by aspirin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the analgesic models, except for the topically administered extract on acetylcholine-induced pain. Acute oral administration up to 10 g/kg did not cause death within 14 days, but mortalities were produced in i.p. administered extract with LD(50) of 2.5+/-0.3 g/kg. Based on these, the extract may contain orally safe, topically and orally effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic principles, which justify its use in traditional African medicine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine of the University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. 12003 Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria. ooadey@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18675525

Citation

Adeyemi, Olufunmilayo O., et al. "Inhibition of Chemically Induced Inflammation and Pain By Orally and Topically Administered Leaf Extract of Manihot Esculenta Crantz in Rodents." Journal of Ethnopharmacology, vol. 119, no. 1, 2008, pp. 6-11.
Adeyemi OO, Yemitan OK, Afolabi L. Inhibition of chemically induced inflammation and pain by orally and topically administered leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz in rodents. J Ethnopharmacol. 2008;119(1):6-11.
Adeyemi, O. O., Yemitan, O. K., & Afolabi, L. (2008). Inhibition of chemically induced inflammation and pain by orally and topically administered leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz in rodents. Journal of Ethnopharmacology, 119(1), 6-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2008.05.019
Adeyemi OO, Yemitan OK, Afolabi L. Inhibition of Chemically Induced Inflammation and Pain By Orally and Topically Administered Leaf Extract of Manihot Esculenta Crantz in Rodents. J Ethnopharmacol. 2008 Sep 2;119(1):6-11. PubMed PMID: 18675525.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inhibition of chemically induced inflammation and pain by orally and topically administered leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz in rodents. AU - Adeyemi,Olufunmilayo O, AU - Yemitan,Omoniyi K, AU - Afolabi,Lateef, Y1 - 2008/05/28/ PY - 2007/09/06/received PY - 2008/05/07/revised PY - 2008/05/21/accepted PY - 2008/8/5/pubmed PY - 2009/1/22/medline PY - 2008/8/5/entrez SP - 6 EP - 11 JF - Journal of ethnopharmacology JO - J Ethnopharmacol VL - 119 IS - 1 N2 - The aqueous leaf extract of Manihot esculenta Crantz (MELE) is being used orally and topically in traditional African medicine for the treatment of inflammation and pain, and claimed to be safe. The anti-inflammatory effects of MELE (100-400 mg/kg, p.o. or 1-4%, w/w in petroleum jelly, topically) were tested against carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats as well as against xylene-induced ear oedema in mice. The analgesic effect of MELE (100-400 mg/kg, p.o. or 1-4%, w/w in petroleum jelly, topically) was tested against acetic acid-induced (20 microl, 0.6%, v/v in normal saline, i.p.) and acetylcholine-induced (8.3 mg/kg, i.p.) mouse writhing models. At 100-400 mg/kg, p.o. and 1-4% (w/w), topically, MELE produced significant inhibitions of carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema and xylene-induced ear swelling in mice. Effects produced by MELE were significantly higher than those produced by indomethacin (10 mg/kg, s.c. or 1%, w/w in petroleum jelly) in the anti-inflammatory models. For the analgesic effect, MELE (100-400 mg/kg, orally) and (1-4%, w/w, topically), like aspirin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) exhibited significant (P<0.05) inhibition of acetic acid- and acetylcholine-induced mouse writhing tests, compared to untreated control. Effects produced by MELE were significantly lower than those produced by aspirin (100 mg/kg, i.p.) in the analgesic models, except for the topically administered extract on acetylcholine-induced pain. Acute oral administration up to 10 g/kg did not cause death within 14 days, but mortalities were produced in i.p. administered extract with LD(50) of 2.5+/-0.3 g/kg. Based on these, the extract may contain orally safe, topically and orally effective anti-inflammatory and analgesic principles, which justify its use in traditional African medicine. SN - 0378-8741 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18675525/Inhibition_of_chemically_induced_inflammation_and_pain_by_orally_and_topically_administered_leaf_extract_of_Manihot_esculenta_Crantz_in_rodents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0378-8741(08)00281-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -