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Does connection to primary care matter for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder?
Pediatrics. 2008 Aug; 122(2):368-74.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Whether high-quality primary care in the form of a medical home effectively meets the health care needs of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is unknown. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the percentage who report unmet health care need, (2) evaluate whether having a medical home is associated with lower risk for having unmet needs, and (3) compare the impact of having a medical home on unmet need for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with those with asthma.

METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the National Survey of Children's Health, 2003, a nationally representative sample. The primary outcome variable was parent-reported unmet health care need. Multivariate logistic regression tested the impact of having a medical home on unmet needs for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and asthma.

RESULTS

The National Survey of Children's Health interviewed parents of 6030 children who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 6133 children who had asthma and were between the ages of 6 and 17 years. A total of 16.8% of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had at least 1 unmet need compared with 6.7% of children with asthma. Although the proportion of children with a medical home was comparable, children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were 3.5 times more likely to have an unmet need than were children with asthma. Children with asthma who have a medical home have less than half the likelihood of reporting an unmet need in comparison with those without a medical home; however, among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, having a medical home was not associated with decreased likelihood of reporting an unmet need.

CONCLUSIONS

Having a medical home is not associated with fewer unmet needs for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Our results suggest that high-quality primary care may not be as successful at meeting the needs of children with behavioral health conditions compared with those with physical conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Harvard-wide Pediatric Health Services Research Fellowship, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. sara.toomey@childrens.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18676555

Citation

Toomey, Sara L., et al. "Does Connection to Primary Care Matter for Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder?" Pediatrics, vol. 122, no. 2, 2008, pp. 368-74.
Toomey SL, Finkelstein J, Kuhlthau K. Does connection to primary care matter for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? Pediatrics. 2008;122(2):368-74.
Toomey, S. L., Finkelstein, J., & Kuhlthau, K. (2008). Does connection to primary care matter for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? Pediatrics, 122(2), 368-74. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2007-2794
Toomey SL, Finkelstein J, Kuhlthau K. Does Connection to Primary Care Matter for Children With Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder. Pediatrics. 2008;122(2):368-74. PubMed PMID: 18676555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does connection to primary care matter for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder? AU - Toomey,Sara L, AU - Finkelstein,Jonathan, AU - Kuhlthau,Karen, PY - 2008/8/5/pubmed PY - 2008/8/23/medline PY - 2008/8/5/entrez SP - 368 EP - 74 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 122 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Whether high-quality primary care in the form of a medical home effectively meets the health care needs of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is unknown. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the percentage who report unmet health care need, (2) evaluate whether having a medical home is associated with lower risk for having unmet needs, and (3) compare the impact of having a medical home on unmet need for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder with those with asthma. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis was conducted of the National Survey of Children's Health, 2003, a nationally representative sample. The primary outcome variable was parent-reported unmet health care need. Multivariate logistic regression tested the impact of having a medical home on unmet needs for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and asthma. RESULTS: The National Survey of Children's Health interviewed parents of 6030 children who had attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and 6133 children who had asthma and were between the ages of 6 and 17 years. A total of 16.8% of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder had at least 1 unmet need compared with 6.7% of children with asthma. Although the proportion of children with a medical home was comparable, children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder were 3.5 times more likely to have an unmet need than were children with asthma. Children with asthma who have a medical home have less than half the likelihood of reporting an unmet need in comparison with those without a medical home; however, among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, having a medical home was not associated with decreased likelihood of reporting an unmet need. CONCLUSIONS: Having a medical home is not associated with fewer unmet needs for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Our results suggest that high-quality primary care may not be as successful at meeting the needs of children with behavioral health conditions compared with those with physical conditions. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18676555/Does_connection_to_primary_care_matter_for_children_with_attention_deficit/hyperactivity_disorder L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18676555 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -