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Allergic vs nonallergic rhinitis: which is more predisposing to chronic rhinosinusitis?
Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008 Jul; 101(1):18-22.AA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The impact of allergy on chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is controversial.

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate whether a history of CRS is more prevalent in patients with allergic rhinitis than in those with nonallergic persistent rhinitis.

METHODS

A total of 115 patients (78 females; mean age, 31.9 years; age range, 14-64 years) with persistent rhinitis were included in the study. A 7-point analog scale was used to report the severity of individual and global CRS symptoms and to determine the impact of rhinosinusitis symptoms on quality of life. The allergic status of the patients was evaluated using skin prick tests for common inhalant allergens, and asthma was evaluated by means of history, physical examination, and respiratory function tests. Rhinoscopy and paranasal sinus computed tomography were used to determine CRS.

RESULTS

Asthma and CRS were not significantly different in allergic and nonallergic patients. Nasal polyps were found equally in both groups (8 patients). However, mean Lund-Mackay staging scores, postnasal drainage, dental pain, and global CRS scores were significantly higher in patients with nonallergic rhinitis (P = .045, P = .001, P = .02, and P = .01, respectively). No significant correlations, except for dental pain (correlation coefficient, 0.250; P = .008), were found between Lund-Mackay scores and CRS symptoms. In rhinoscopy, the only conspicuous difference was nasal purulence in allergic patients (P = .002).

CONCLUSION

Allergic and nonallergic rhinitis may contribute similarly to the development of CRS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Allergy Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul, Turkey. gelincik@istanbul.edu.trNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18681079

Citation

Gelincik, Asli, et al. "Allergic Vs Nonallergic Rhinitis: Which Is More Predisposing to Chronic Rhinosinusitis?" Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, vol. 101, no. 1, 2008, pp. 18-22.
Gelincik A, Büyüköztürk S, Aslan I, et al. Allergic vs nonallergic rhinitis: which is more predisposing to chronic rhinosinusitis? Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008;101(1):18-22.
Gelincik, A., Büyüköztürk, S., Aslan, I., Aydin, S., Ozşeker, F., Colakoğlu, B., & Dal, M. (2008). Allergic vs nonallergic rhinitis: which is more predisposing to chronic rhinosinusitis? Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology : Official Publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology, 101(1), 18-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1081-1206(10)60829-0
Gelincik A, et al. Allergic Vs Nonallergic Rhinitis: Which Is More Predisposing to Chronic Rhinosinusitis. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2008;101(1):18-22. PubMed PMID: 18681079.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Allergic vs nonallergic rhinitis: which is more predisposing to chronic rhinosinusitis? AU - Gelincik,Asli, AU - Büyüköztürk,Suna, AU - Aslan,Ismet, AU - Aydin,Salih, AU - Ozşeker,Ferhan, AU - Colakoğlu,Bahattin, AU - Dal,Murat, PY - 2008/8/7/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/8/7/entrez SP - 18 EP - 22 JF - Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology : official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology JO - Ann. Allergy Asthma Immunol. VL - 101 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The impact of allergy on chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is controversial. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether a history of CRS is more prevalent in patients with allergic rhinitis than in those with nonallergic persistent rhinitis. METHODS: A total of 115 patients (78 females; mean age, 31.9 years; age range, 14-64 years) with persistent rhinitis were included in the study. A 7-point analog scale was used to report the severity of individual and global CRS symptoms and to determine the impact of rhinosinusitis symptoms on quality of life. The allergic status of the patients was evaluated using skin prick tests for common inhalant allergens, and asthma was evaluated by means of history, physical examination, and respiratory function tests. Rhinoscopy and paranasal sinus computed tomography were used to determine CRS. RESULTS: Asthma and CRS were not significantly different in allergic and nonallergic patients. Nasal polyps were found equally in both groups (8 patients). However, mean Lund-Mackay staging scores, postnasal drainage, dental pain, and global CRS scores were significantly higher in patients with nonallergic rhinitis (P = .045, P = .001, P = .02, and P = .01, respectively). No significant correlations, except for dental pain (correlation coefficient, 0.250; P = .008), were found between Lund-Mackay scores and CRS symptoms. In rhinoscopy, the only conspicuous difference was nasal purulence in allergic patients (P = .002). CONCLUSION: Allergic and nonallergic rhinitis may contribute similarly to the development of CRS. SN - 1081-1206 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18681079/Allergic_vs_nonallergic_rhinitis:_which_is_more_predisposing_to_chronic_rhinosinusitis L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1081-1206(10)60829-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -