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Association between cognitive function and periodontal disease in older adults.
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008 Sep; 56(9):1693-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the association between cognitive function and periodontal disease in noninstitutionalized older adults.

DESIGN

Population-based cross-sectional study.

SETTING

National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001 to 2002.

PARTICIPANTS

Eight hundred three dentate participants aged 60 and older who completed the periodontal examination and cognitive function test.

MEASUREMENTS

Periodontal examination, including assessment of probing depth and attachment loss, was performed. Periodontal disease was defined as at least 10% of sites with clinical attachment loss of more than 4 mm and at least 10% sites with probing depth greater than 3 mm. Cognitive function was measured using the 2-minute Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST).

RESULTS

Higher cognitive function was associated with lower odds of periodontal disease. After controlling for demographics, educational level, body mass index, chronic diseases, health behaviors, bleeding on probing, and probing sites, the odds ratio for periodontal disease was 0.69 (95% confidence interval=0.51-0.94) for each standard deviation (SD) increase in the DSST score. Each SD increase in DSST score was associated with a 31% less likelihood of periodontal disease. Mean DSST scores for participants with and without periodontal disease were 42.2 and 45.5 (P=.02), respectively.

CONCLUSION

Higher cognitive function was associated with lower odds of periodontal disease in noninstitutionalized older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dentistry, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18691281

Citation

Yu, Yau-Hua, and Hsu-Ko Kuo. "Association Between Cognitive Function and Periodontal Disease in Older Adults." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 56, no. 9, 2008, pp. 1693-7.
Yu YH, Kuo HK. Association between cognitive function and periodontal disease in older adults. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(9):1693-7.
Yu, Y. H., & Kuo, H. K. (2008). Association between cognitive function and periodontal disease in older adults. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 56(9), 1693-7. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01847.x
Yu YH, Kuo HK. Association Between Cognitive Function and Periodontal Disease in Older Adults. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2008;56(9):1693-7. PubMed PMID: 18691281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between cognitive function and periodontal disease in older adults. AU - Yu,Yau-Hua, AU - Kuo,Hsu-Ko, Y1 - 2008/08/06/ PY - 2008/8/12/pubmed PY - 2009/2/3/medline PY - 2008/8/12/entrez SP - 1693 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 56 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the association between cognitive function and periodontal disease in noninstitutionalized older adults. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2001 to 2002. PARTICIPANTS: Eight hundred three dentate participants aged 60 and older who completed the periodontal examination and cognitive function test. MEASUREMENTS: Periodontal examination, including assessment of probing depth and attachment loss, was performed. Periodontal disease was defined as at least 10% of sites with clinical attachment loss of more than 4 mm and at least 10% sites with probing depth greater than 3 mm. Cognitive function was measured using the 2-minute Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST). RESULTS: Higher cognitive function was associated with lower odds of periodontal disease. After controlling for demographics, educational level, body mass index, chronic diseases, health behaviors, bleeding on probing, and probing sites, the odds ratio for periodontal disease was 0.69 (95% confidence interval=0.51-0.94) for each standard deviation (SD) increase in the DSST score. Each SD increase in DSST score was associated with a 31% less likelihood of periodontal disease. Mean DSST scores for participants with and without periodontal disease were 42.2 and 45.5 (P=.02), respectively. CONCLUSION: Higher cognitive function was associated with lower odds of periodontal disease in noninstitutionalized older adults. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18691281/Association_between_cognitive_function_and_periodontal_disease_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2008.01847.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -