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Detection and typing of enteroviruses from CSF specimens from patients diagnosed with meningitis/encephalitis.
J Clin Virol. 2008 Oct; 43(2):207-11.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Human enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis. Rapid enterovirus detection and identification is important in order to ruleout other causes of disease, initiate appropriate patient management and to aid in epidemiological investigations.

OBJECTIVES

A 2-year study (2005-2006) of patients with symptoms of meningitis/encephalitis was performed in New York State (NYS) to determine the underlying enteroviral etiology.

STUDY DESIGN

Reverse-transcription, followed by a sequential PCR strategy targeting the 5'-nontranslated and VP1 regions, were used to first detect and then type, these RNA viruses.

RESULT

From a total of 1374 specimens tested, enterovirus was detected in 67 specimens (4.9%); of these, 59 could subsequently be typed. Coxsackievirus B5 was found in 14 cases in 2005, but none in 2006. Overall, 14 enterovirus serotypes were detected.

CONCLUSIONS

The most prevalent enteroviruses in this cohort were Coxsackievirus B5, and echoviruses 18, and 6 collectively accounting for 46%. 2005 was a period of high activity for Coxsackievirus B5 in NYS. A large majority of the enterovirus-positive patients suffered from headache and fever. In most cases, the cerebrospinal fluid profile was reported and generally showed elevated protein levels (>45mg/dl) and a higher than normal white blood cell count (>5mm(3)).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health, Empire State Plaza, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201, United States. norma.tavakoli@wadsworth.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18692435

Citation

Tavakoli, Norma P., et al. "Detection and Typing of Enteroviruses From CSF Specimens From Patients Diagnosed With Meningitis/encephalitis." Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, vol. 43, no. 2, 2008, pp. 207-11.
Tavakoli NP, Wang H, Nattanmai S, et al. Detection and typing of enteroviruses from CSF specimens from patients diagnosed with meningitis/encephalitis. J Clin Virol. 2008;43(2):207-11.
Tavakoli, N. P., Wang, H., Nattanmai, S., Dupuis, M., Fusco, H., & Hull, R. (2008). Detection and typing of enteroviruses from CSF specimens from patients diagnosed with meningitis/encephalitis. Journal of Clinical Virology : the Official Publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology, 43(2), 207-11. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcv.2008.06.016
Tavakoli NP, et al. Detection and Typing of Enteroviruses From CSF Specimens From Patients Diagnosed With Meningitis/encephalitis. J Clin Virol. 2008;43(2):207-11. PubMed PMID: 18692435.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Detection and typing of enteroviruses from CSF specimens from patients diagnosed with meningitis/encephalitis. AU - Tavakoli,Norma P, AU - Wang,Heng, AU - Nattanmai,Seela, AU - Dupuis,Michelle, AU - Fusco,Heather, AU - Hull,Rene, Y1 - 2008/08/09/ PY - 2008/01/18/received PY - 2008/05/20/revised PY - 2008/06/30/accepted PY - 2008/8/12/pubmed PY - 2008/12/17/medline PY - 2008/8/12/entrez SP - 207 EP - 11 JF - Journal of clinical virology : the official publication of the Pan American Society for Clinical Virology JO - J Clin Virol VL - 43 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Human enteroviruses are the most common cause of viral meningitis. Rapid enterovirus detection and identification is important in order to ruleout other causes of disease, initiate appropriate patient management and to aid in epidemiological investigations. OBJECTIVES: A 2-year study (2005-2006) of patients with symptoms of meningitis/encephalitis was performed in New York State (NYS) to determine the underlying enteroviral etiology. STUDY DESIGN: Reverse-transcription, followed by a sequential PCR strategy targeting the 5'-nontranslated and VP1 regions, were used to first detect and then type, these RNA viruses. RESULT: From a total of 1374 specimens tested, enterovirus was detected in 67 specimens (4.9%); of these, 59 could subsequently be typed. Coxsackievirus B5 was found in 14 cases in 2005, but none in 2006. Overall, 14 enterovirus serotypes were detected. CONCLUSIONS: The most prevalent enteroviruses in this cohort were Coxsackievirus B5, and echoviruses 18, and 6 collectively accounting for 46%. 2005 was a period of high activity for Coxsackievirus B5 in NYS. A large majority of the enterovirus-positive patients suffered from headache and fever. In most cases, the cerebrospinal fluid profile was reported and generally showed elevated protein levels (>45mg/dl) and a higher than normal white blood cell count (>5mm(3)). SN - 1386-6532 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18692435/Detection_and_typing_of_enteroviruses_from_CSF_specimens_from_patients_diagnosed_with_meningitis/encephalitis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1386-6532(08)00245-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -