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[A rare cause of catheter-related bacteremia: Rhizobium radiobacter].
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2008 Apr; 42(2):349-52.MB

Abstract

Rhizobium spp. (R. radiobacter, R. rhizogenes, R. rubi, R. vitis) are aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, oxidase-positive, gram-negative bacilli. Although they are mostly plant pathogens, R. radiobacter may cause human infections. The aim of this report was to present a case of R. radiobacter bacteremia treated with levofloxacin. Twenty-seven year old male patient had fever after receiving chemotherapy due to osteosarcoma. The infection focus could not be detected in the initial physical examination. Blood cultures were obtained from peripheral veins and central catheter and levofloxacin (500 mg/day) was started as empirical therapy. His fever resolved on the next day. Meanwhile cultures of blood (Bact/Alert automated systems, bioMerieux, Durham, NC) obtained from peripheral veins and central catheters yielded bacteria which were identified as R. radiobacter by VITEK 2 (bioMerieux Inc, Mercy L'etoil, France). The strain was resistant to amikacin and sensitive to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. The patient was diagnosed as catheter-related bacteremia and the treatment was continued for 14 days. His catheter was not removed since subsequent cultures did not reveal any bacterial growth. In conclusion this case suggests that R. radiobacter may cause infections especially in immunocompromised patients with catheters or prosthetic devices. To our knowledge this is the first R. radiobacter case reported from Turkey and the first case of R. radiobacter bacteremia reported to be treated with levofloxacin in the literature.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ege Universitesi Tip Fakültesi, Enfeksiyon Hastaliklari ve Klinik Mikrobiyoloji Anabilim Dali, Izmir. meltem.tasbakan@ege.edu.trNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

tur

PubMed ID

18697434

Citation

Işikgoz Taşbakan, Meltem, et al. "[A Rare Cause of Catheter-related Bacteremia: Rhizobium Radiobacter]." Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni, vol. 42, no. 2, 2008, pp. 349-52.
Işikgoz Taşbakan M, Görümlü G, Pullukçu H, et al. [A rare cause of catheter-related bacteremia: Rhizobium radiobacter]. Mikrobiyol Bul. 2008;42(2):349-52.
Işikgoz Taşbakan, M., Görümlü, G., Pullukçu, H., Sanli, U. A., Sipahi, O. R., Karabulut, B., & Tünger, A. (2008). [A rare cause of catheter-related bacteremia: Rhizobium radiobacter]. Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni, 42(2), 349-52.
Işikgoz Taşbakan M, et al. [A Rare Cause of Catheter-related Bacteremia: Rhizobium Radiobacter]. Mikrobiyol Bul. 2008;42(2):349-52. PubMed PMID: 18697434.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [A rare cause of catheter-related bacteremia: Rhizobium radiobacter]. AU - Işikgoz Taşbakan,Meltem, AU - Görümlü,Gürbüz, AU - Pullukçu,Hüsnü, AU - Sanli,Ulus Ali, AU - Sipahi,Oğuz Reşat, AU - Karabulut,Bülent, AU - Tünger,Alper, PY - 2008/8/14/pubmed PY - 2009/3/25/medline PY - 2008/8/14/entrez SP - 349 EP - 52 JF - Mikrobiyoloji bulteni JO - Mikrobiyol Bul VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - Rhizobium spp. (R. radiobacter, R. rhizogenes, R. rubi, R. vitis) are aerobic, motile, non-spore forming, oxidase-positive, gram-negative bacilli. Although they are mostly plant pathogens, R. radiobacter may cause human infections. The aim of this report was to present a case of R. radiobacter bacteremia treated with levofloxacin. Twenty-seven year old male patient had fever after receiving chemotherapy due to osteosarcoma. The infection focus could not be detected in the initial physical examination. Blood cultures were obtained from peripheral veins and central catheter and levofloxacin (500 mg/day) was started as empirical therapy. His fever resolved on the next day. Meanwhile cultures of blood (Bact/Alert automated systems, bioMerieux, Durham, NC) obtained from peripheral veins and central catheters yielded bacteria which were identified as R. radiobacter by VITEK 2 (bioMerieux Inc, Mercy L'etoil, France). The strain was resistant to amikacin and sensitive to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, imipenem, meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. The patient was diagnosed as catheter-related bacteremia and the treatment was continued for 14 days. His catheter was not removed since subsequent cultures did not reveal any bacterial growth. In conclusion this case suggests that R. radiobacter may cause infections especially in immunocompromised patients with catheters or prosthetic devices. To our knowledge this is the first R. radiobacter case reported from Turkey and the first case of R. radiobacter bacteremia reported to be treated with levofloxacin in the literature. SN - 0374-9096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18697434/[A_rare_cause_of_catheter_related_bacteremia:_Rhizobium_radiobacter]_ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-RB1-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -