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Strategies for breastfeeding success.
Am Fam Physician 2008; 78(2):225-32AF

Abstract

Breastfeeding provides significant health benefits for infants and mothers. However, the United States continues to fall short of the breastfeeding goals set by the Healthy People 2010 initiative. The American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology have policy statements supporting breastfeeding that reflect recent advancements in understanding the mechanisms underlying the benefits of breastfeeding and in the clinical management of breastfeeding. Despite popular belief, there are few contraindications to breastfeeding. Providing maternal support and structured antenatal and postpartum breastfeeding education are the most effective means of achieving breastfeeding success. In addition, immediate skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant and early initiation of breastfeeding are shown to improve breastfeeding outcomes. When concerns about lactation arise during newborn visits, the infant must be carefully assessed for jaundice, weight loss, and signs of failure to thrive. If a work-up is required, parents should be supported in their decision to breastfeed. Certified lactation consultants can provide valuable support and education to patients. Physicians should educate working women who breastfeed about the availability of breast pumps and the proper storage of expressed breast milk. Physicians must be aware of their patients' lactation status when prescribing medications, as some may affect milk supply or be unsafe for breastfeeding infants. Through support and encouragement of breastfeeding, national breastfeeding goals can be met.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Offutt Air Force Base/University of Nebraska Medical Center Family Medicine Residency, Omaha, Nebraska 68113, USA. medstar2@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18697506

Citation

Keister, Drew, et al. "Strategies for Breastfeeding Success." American Family Physician, vol. 78, no. 2, 2008, pp. 225-32.
Keister D, Roberts KT, Werner SL. Strategies for breastfeeding success. Am Fam Physician. 2008;78(2):225-32.
Keister, D., Roberts, K. T., & Werner, S. L. (2008). Strategies for breastfeeding success. American Family Physician, 78(2), pp. 225-32.
Keister D, Roberts KT, Werner SL. Strategies for Breastfeeding Success. Am Fam Physician. 2008 Jul 15;78(2):225-32. PubMed PMID: 18697506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Strategies for breastfeeding success. AU - Keister,Drew, AU - Roberts,Kismet T, AU - Werner,Stephanie L, PY - 2008/8/14/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/8/14/entrez SP - 225 EP - 32 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 78 IS - 2 N2 - Breastfeeding provides significant health benefits for infants and mothers. However, the United States continues to fall short of the breastfeeding goals set by the Healthy People 2010 initiative. The American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology have policy statements supporting breastfeeding that reflect recent advancements in understanding the mechanisms underlying the benefits of breastfeeding and in the clinical management of breastfeeding. Despite popular belief, there are few contraindications to breastfeeding. Providing maternal support and structured antenatal and postpartum breastfeeding education are the most effective means of achieving breastfeeding success. In addition, immediate skin-to-skin contact between mother and infant and early initiation of breastfeeding are shown to improve breastfeeding outcomes. When concerns about lactation arise during newborn visits, the infant must be carefully assessed for jaundice, weight loss, and signs of failure to thrive. If a work-up is required, parents should be supported in their decision to breastfeed. Certified lactation consultants can provide valuable support and education to patients. Physicians should educate working women who breastfeed about the availability of breast pumps and the proper storage of expressed breast milk. Physicians must be aware of their patients' lactation status when prescribing medications, as some may affect milk supply or be unsafe for breastfeeding infants. Through support and encouragement of breastfeeding, national breastfeeding goals can be met. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18697506/Strategies_for_breastfeeding_success_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=18697506 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -