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International travel and exposure risks in solid-organ transplant recipients.
Transplantation. 2008 Aug 15; 86(3):407-12.T

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Although solid-organ transplant recipients (SOTR) have an increased risk of acquiring illnesses, they may not receive optimal pretravel care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of travel activities and outcomes among SOTR.

METHODS

Two thousand five hundred fifty-four consecutive living SOTR from Mayo Clinic were surveyed regarding travel practices, pretravel counseling, exposure risks, and illness using a previously standardized and validated questionnaire.

RESULTS

One thousand one hundred thirty SOTR (44%) responded to the survey and were included in the study. The most common transplanted organs were liver (519 patients) and kidney (515 patients). Three hundred and three (27%) respondents reported travel outside of the United States or Canada after their transplant. Liver recipients were more likely to travel than other organ recipients. Ninety-six percent of travelers reported that they did not seek specific pretravel healthcare before their trip. Forty-nine SOTR (16%) traveled to destinations at higher risk for infectious diseases; travelers to these destinations were more likely to be men (73% vs. 54% of low-infection risk travelers, P=0.018) or born outside the United Stated or Canada (29% vs. 6% P<0.0001). Twenty-four travelers (8%) required medical attention because of illness; illness was more likely among travelers to high-infection risk (18%) than low-risk (6%) destinations, P=0.004.

CONCLUSIONS

International travel was common after solid organ transplantation, although the majority traveled to destinations at low risk for infectious disease. Although generally SOTR were able to travel safely, travelers to destinations at high-risk for infection had a significant rate of illness. Pretravel counseling and interventions were infrequent and should be improved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. duslan@mednet.ucla.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18698243

Citation

Uslan, Daniel Z., et al. "International Travel and Exposure Risks in Solid-organ Transplant Recipients." Transplantation, vol. 86, no. 3, 2008, pp. 407-12.
Uslan DZ, Patel R, Virk A. International travel and exposure risks in solid-organ transplant recipients. Transplantation. 2008;86(3):407-12.
Uslan, D. Z., Patel, R., & Virk, A. (2008). International travel and exposure risks in solid-organ transplant recipients. Transplantation, 86(3), 407-12. https://doi.org/10.1097/TP.0b013e31817c0673
Uslan DZ, Patel R, Virk A. International Travel and Exposure Risks in Solid-organ Transplant Recipients. Transplantation. 2008 Aug 15;86(3):407-12. PubMed PMID: 18698243.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - International travel and exposure risks in solid-organ transplant recipients. AU - Uslan,Daniel Z, AU - Patel,Robin, AU - Virk,Abinash, PY - 2008/8/14/pubmed PY - 2008/9/20/medline PY - 2008/8/14/entrez SP - 407 EP - 12 JF - Transplantation JO - Transplantation VL - 86 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Although solid-organ transplant recipients (SOTR) have an increased risk of acquiring illnesses, they may not receive optimal pretravel care. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of travel activities and outcomes among SOTR. METHODS: Two thousand five hundred fifty-four consecutive living SOTR from Mayo Clinic were surveyed regarding travel practices, pretravel counseling, exposure risks, and illness using a previously standardized and validated questionnaire. RESULTS: One thousand one hundred thirty SOTR (44%) responded to the survey and were included in the study. The most common transplanted organs were liver (519 patients) and kidney (515 patients). Three hundred and three (27%) respondents reported travel outside of the United States or Canada after their transplant. Liver recipients were more likely to travel than other organ recipients. Ninety-six percent of travelers reported that they did not seek specific pretravel healthcare before their trip. Forty-nine SOTR (16%) traveled to destinations at higher risk for infectious diseases; travelers to these destinations were more likely to be men (73% vs. 54% of low-infection risk travelers, P=0.018) or born outside the United Stated or Canada (29% vs. 6% P<0.0001). Twenty-four travelers (8%) required medical attention because of illness; illness was more likely among travelers to high-infection risk (18%) than low-risk (6%) destinations, P=0.004. CONCLUSIONS: International travel was common after solid organ transplantation, although the majority traveled to destinations at low risk for infectious disease. Although generally SOTR were able to travel safely, travelers to destinations at high-risk for infection had a significant rate of illness. Pretravel counseling and interventions were infrequent and should be improved. SN - 0041-1337 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18698243/International_travel_and_exposure_risks_in_solid_organ_transplant_recipients_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/TP.0b013e31817c0673 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -