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Infant feeding practices among HIV infected women receiving prevention of mother-to-child transmission services at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya.
East Afr Med J 2008; 85(4):156-61EA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To determine the types and modes of infant feeding practices among the HIV infected mothers on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and attending MCH-FP clinic at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya.

DESIGN

Descriptive cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Kitale District Hospital in Western Kenya within the maternal and child health and family planning (MCH-FP) and comprehensive care clinics.

SUBJECTS

A total of 146 respondents who had delivered 150 babies were recruited for this study.

RESULTS

Thirty five percent (52/150) of the babies were exclusively breastfed while 50% (75/150) were not breastfed at all and 14% (21/150) of the babies received mixed feeding. The length of exclusive breastfeeding ranged from 1-6 months with most (53%) women exclusively breastfeeding for two to three months. Only 13% of the women exclusively breastfed for five to six months. There was a strong relationship between mode of infant feeding and spouse's awareness of HIV status. Mothers who had disclosed their HIV status to their spouses were more likely not to breastfeed than mothers who had not disclosed their status (p < 0.05%). The choice of infant feeding method was also influenced by the socio-economic status of the mothers and nevirapine uptake. The level of education did not influence the mode of infant feeding.

CONCLUSION

Infant feeding decisions were mainly influenced by the male partner's involvement and the socio economic status of the mother. Half of the respondents did not breastfeed at all. The duration of exclusive breastfeeding rarely reached six months. To encourage women to adhere to good infant feeding practices, involvement of their partners, family members as well as the community for support should be encouraged.

Authors+Show Affiliations

North Rift Province, Ministry of Health, NASCOP, KVDA Plaza, 11th Floor, P.O. Box 5665, Eldoret, Kenya.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18700348

Citation

Bii, S C., et al. "Infant Feeding Practices Among HIV Infected Women Receiving Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission Services at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya." East African Medical Journal, vol. 85, no. 4, 2008, pp. 156-61.
Bii SC, Otieno-Nyunya B, Siika A, et al. Infant feeding practices among HIV infected women receiving prevention of mother-to-child transmission services at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya. East Afr Med J. 2008;85(4):156-61.
Bii, S. C., Otieno-Nyunya, B., Siika, A., & Rotich, J. K. (2008). Infant feeding practices among HIV infected women receiving prevention of mother-to-child transmission services at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya. East African Medical Journal, 85(4), pp. 156-61.
Bii SC, et al. Infant Feeding Practices Among HIV Infected Women Receiving Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission Services at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya. East Afr Med J. 2008;85(4):156-61. PubMed PMID: 18700348.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Infant feeding practices among HIV infected women receiving prevention of mother-to-child transmission services at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya. AU - Bii,S C, AU - Otieno-Nyunya,B, AU - Siika,A, AU - Rotich,J K, PY - 2008/8/15/pubmed PY - 2008/9/11/medline PY - 2008/8/15/entrez SP - 156 EP - 61 JF - East African medical journal JO - East Afr Med J VL - 85 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To determine the types and modes of infant feeding practices among the HIV infected mothers on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and attending MCH-FP clinic at Kitale District Hospital, Kenya. DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study. SETTING: Kitale District Hospital in Western Kenya within the maternal and child health and family planning (MCH-FP) and comprehensive care clinics. SUBJECTS: A total of 146 respondents who had delivered 150 babies were recruited for this study. RESULTS: Thirty five percent (52/150) of the babies were exclusively breastfed while 50% (75/150) were not breastfed at all and 14% (21/150) of the babies received mixed feeding. The length of exclusive breastfeeding ranged from 1-6 months with most (53%) women exclusively breastfeeding for two to three months. Only 13% of the women exclusively breastfed for five to six months. There was a strong relationship between mode of infant feeding and spouse's awareness of HIV status. Mothers who had disclosed their HIV status to their spouses were more likely not to breastfeed than mothers who had not disclosed their status (p < 0.05%). The choice of infant feeding method was also influenced by the socio-economic status of the mothers and nevirapine uptake. The level of education did not influence the mode of infant feeding. CONCLUSION: Infant feeding decisions were mainly influenced by the male partner's involvement and the socio economic status of the mother. Half of the respondents did not breastfeed at all. The duration of exclusive breastfeeding rarely reached six months. To encourage women to adhere to good infant feeding practices, involvement of their partners, family members as well as the community for support should be encouraged. SN - 0012-835X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18700348/Infant_feeding_practices_among_HIV_infected_women_receiving_prevention_of_mother_to_child_transmission_services_at_Kitale_District_Hospital_Kenya_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9735 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -