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Prostate weight and early potency in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy.
Urology. 2008 Dec; 72(6):1263-8.U

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Using an athermal technique for nerve preservation we noted that approximately 40% are potent compared with approximately 60% who are not at 3 months after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RLP). In an attempt to understand this difference, we examine factors potentially influencing potency at 3 months.

METHODS

Of 300 consecutive RLPs, we identified 139 men who met preoperative inclusion criteria: age <or= 65 years with International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) scores of 22-25. All men were instructed to take 5'-phosphodiesterase inhibitors postoperatively. All data were collected and entered prospectively into an electronic database. Sexual outcomes were obtained via self-administered validated questionnaires. We defined potency by affirmative answers to the following questions: Were erections adequate for penetration, and were they satisfactory?

RESULTS

At 3 months, 53 subjects (38%) were potent. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated no effect for IIEF-5 score, body mass index, nerves spared, estimated blood loss, hypertension, diabetes, use of cholesterol-lowering agents, and lifestyle issues. Prostate weight (43.3 vs 51.4 g, P = .038) and age (55 vs 57, P = .03) were significant in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis only prostate weight was predictive of potency (P = .04). To ascertain a possible relation between traction nerve injury and prostate weight, analysis between prostate weight groups and potency demonstrated an inverse relationship.

CONCLUSIONS

Low prostate weight was the only factor found to correlate with early return of potency. Our data also suggest that increasing prostate weight increases the risk of delay in potency recovery.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Urology, University of California, Irvine Medical Center, Orange, California 92868, USA. tahlerin@uci.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18701150

Citation

Ahlering, Thomas E., et al. "Prostate Weight and Early Potency in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy." Urology, vol. 72, no. 6, 2008, pp. 1263-8.
Ahlering TE, Kaplan AG, Yee DS, et al. Prostate weight and early potency in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Urology. 2008;72(6):1263-8.
Ahlering, T. E., Kaplan, A. G., Yee, D. S., & Skarecky, D. W. (2008). Prostate weight and early potency in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. Urology, 72(6), 1263-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2008.05.055
Ahlering TE, et al. Prostate Weight and Early Potency in Robot-assisted Radical Prostatectomy. Urology. 2008;72(6):1263-8. PubMed PMID: 18701150.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prostate weight and early potency in robot-assisted radical prostatectomy. AU - Ahlering,Thomas E, AU - Kaplan,Adam G, AU - Yee,David S, AU - Skarecky,Douglas W, Y1 - 2008/08/13/ PY - 2008/02/22/received PY - 2008/04/15/revised PY - 2008/05/20/accepted PY - 2008/8/15/pubmed PY - 2009/1/7/medline PY - 2008/8/15/entrez SP - 1263 EP - 8 JF - Urology JO - Urology VL - 72 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Using an athermal technique for nerve preservation we noted that approximately 40% are potent compared with approximately 60% who are not at 3 months after robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RLP). In an attempt to understand this difference, we examine factors potentially influencing potency at 3 months. METHODS: Of 300 consecutive RLPs, we identified 139 men who met preoperative inclusion criteria: age <or= 65 years with International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF-5) scores of 22-25. All men were instructed to take 5'-phosphodiesterase inhibitors postoperatively. All data were collected and entered prospectively into an electronic database. Sexual outcomes were obtained via self-administered validated questionnaires. We defined potency by affirmative answers to the following questions: Were erections adequate for penetration, and were they satisfactory? RESULTS: At 3 months, 53 subjects (38%) were potent. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated no effect for IIEF-5 score, body mass index, nerves spared, estimated blood loss, hypertension, diabetes, use of cholesterol-lowering agents, and lifestyle issues. Prostate weight (43.3 vs 51.4 g, P = .038) and age (55 vs 57, P = .03) were significant in univariate analysis. In multivariate analysis only prostate weight was predictive of potency (P = .04). To ascertain a possible relation between traction nerve injury and prostate weight, analysis between prostate weight groups and potency demonstrated an inverse relationship. CONCLUSIONS: Low prostate weight was the only factor found to correlate with early return of potency. Our data also suggest that increasing prostate weight increases the risk of delay in potency recovery. SN - 1527-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18701150/Prostate_weight_and_early_potency_in_robot_assisted_radical_prostatectomy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-4295(08)00767-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -