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Effect of weight reduction on rhinometric measurements in overweight patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
Am J Rhinol. 2008 Jul-Aug; 22(4):410-5.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Elevated nasal resistance and obesity predispose to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Weight loss has been shown to result in an alleviation of OSA, but its effect on nasal airflow has not been studied.

METHODS

This study was a prospective, randomized, controlled study with two parallel groups. A total of 52 adult overweight patients (body mass index [BMI], 28-40 kg/m2) with mild obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 5-15) were randomized into two study groups. The intervention group (n = 26) followed a very low calorie diet with a supervised lifestyle intervention while the control group (n = 26) received routine lifestyle counseling. The changes in BMI, total nasal resistance, total nasal volume, and quality of life scores (Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire, MiniRQLQ) were assessed at baseline and after the intervention at 3 months.

RESULTS

The reduction in BMI in the intervention group was significantly greater than that achieved by patients in the control group (5.4 kg/m2 versus 0.5 kg/m2). Accordingly, AHI was reduced by 3.2 events/hour in the intervention group and by 1.3 in the control group. However, there were no significant changes in rhinometric measurements despite significant weight loss. There was no correlation between the reduction of BMI and the change in nasal resistance or MiniRQLQ scores.

CONCLUSION

Weight reduction does not seem to have any effect on nasal resistance or volume in overweight patients with mild OSA. Patients with OSA and impaired nasal breathing need specific medical or surgical treatment to restore nasal airflow.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Clinical Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. tatu.kemppainen@kuh.fiNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18702908

Citation

Kemppainen, Tatu, et al. "Effect of Weight Reduction On Rhinometric Measurements in Overweight Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea." American Journal of Rhinology, vol. 22, no. 4, 2008, pp. 410-5.
Kemppainen T, Ruoppi P, Seppä J, et al. Effect of weight reduction on rhinometric measurements in overweight patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Am J Rhinol. 2008;22(4):410-5.
Kemppainen, T., Ruoppi, P., Seppä, J., Sahlman, J., Peltonen, M., Tukiainen, H., Gylling, H., Vanninen, E., & Tuomilehto, H. (2008). Effect of weight reduction on rhinometric measurements in overweight patients with obstructive sleep apnea. American Journal of Rhinology, 22(4), 410-5. https://doi.org/10.2500/ajr.2008.22.3203
Kemppainen T, et al. Effect of Weight Reduction On Rhinometric Measurements in Overweight Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Am J Rhinol. 2008;22(4):410-5. PubMed PMID: 18702908.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of weight reduction on rhinometric measurements in overweight patients with obstructive sleep apnea. AU - Kemppainen,Tatu, AU - Ruoppi,Pirkko, AU - Seppä,Juha, AU - Sahlman,Johanna, AU - Peltonen,Markku, AU - Tukiainen,Hannu, AU - Gylling,Helena, AU - Vanninen,Esko, AU - Tuomilehto,Henri, PY - 2008/8/16/pubmed PY - 2008/10/10/medline PY - 2008/8/16/entrez SP - 410 EP - 5 JF - American journal of rhinology JO - Am J Rhinol VL - 22 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Elevated nasal resistance and obesity predispose to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Weight loss has been shown to result in an alleviation of OSA, but its effect on nasal airflow has not been studied. METHODS: This study was a prospective, randomized, controlled study with two parallel groups. A total of 52 adult overweight patients (body mass index [BMI], 28-40 kg/m2) with mild obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), 5-15) were randomized into two study groups. The intervention group (n = 26) followed a very low calorie diet with a supervised lifestyle intervention while the control group (n = 26) received routine lifestyle counseling. The changes in BMI, total nasal resistance, total nasal volume, and quality of life scores (Mini Rhinoconjunctivitis Quality of Life Questionnaire, MiniRQLQ) were assessed at baseline and after the intervention at 3 months. RESULTS: The reduction in BMI in the intervention group was significantly greater than that achieved by patients in the control group (5.4 kg/m2 versus 0.5 kg/m2). Accordingly, AHI was reduced by 3.2 events/hour in the intervention group and by 1.3 in the control group. However, there were no significant changes in rhinometric measurements despite significant weight loss. There was no correlation between the reduction of BMI and the change in nasal resistance or MiniRQLQ scores. CONCLUSION: Weight reduction does not seem to have any effect on nasal resistance or volume in overweight patients with mild OSA. Patients with OSA and impaired nasal breathing need specific medical or surgical treatment to restore nasal airflow. SN - 1050-6586 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18702908/Effect_of_weight_reduction_on_rhinometric_measurements_in_overweight_patients_with_obstructive_sleep_apnea_ L2 - https://ClinicalTrials.gov/search/term=18702908 [PUBMED-IDS] DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -