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Converting dose-length product to effective dose at CT.
Radiology. 2008 Sep; 248(3):995-1003.R

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine effective dose (ED) per unit dose-length product (DLP) conversion factors for computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A CT dosimetry spreadsheet was used to compute patient ED values and corresponding DLP values. The ratio of ED to DLP was determined with 16-section CT scanners from four vendors, as well as with five models from one manufacturer that spanned more than 25 years. ED-to-DLP ratios were determined for 2-cm scan lengths along the patient axis, as well as for typical scan lengths encountered at head and body CT examinations. The dependence of the ratio of ED to DLP on x-ray tube voltage (in kilovolts) was investigated, and the values obtained with the spreadsheet were compared with those obtained by using two other commercially available CT dosimetry software packages.

RESULTS

For 2-cm scan lengths, changes in the scan region resulted in differences to ED of a factor of 30, but much lower variation was obtained for typical scan lengths at clinical head and body imaging. Inter- and intramanufacturer differences for ED/DLP were generally small. Representative values of ED/DLP at 120 kV were 2.2 microSv/mGy x cm (head scans), 5.4 microSv/mGy x cm (cervical spine scans), and 18 microSv/mGy x cm (body scans). For head scans, ED/DLP was approximately independent of x-ray tube voltage, but for body scans, the increase from 80 to 140 kV increased the ratio of ED to DLP by approximately 25%. Agreement in ED/DLP data for all three software packages was generally very good, except for cervical spine examinations where one software package determined an ED/DLP ratio that was approximately double that of the other two.

CONCLUSION

This article describes a method of providing CT users with a practical and reliable estimate of adult patient EDs by using the DLP displayed on the CT console at the end of any given examination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Medical University of South Carolina, PO Box 250322, 169 Ashley Ave, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. huda@musc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18710988

Citation

Huda, Walter, et al. "Converting Dose-length Product to Effective Dose at CT." Radiology, vol. 248, no. 3, 2008, pp. 995-1003.
Huda W, Ogden KM, Khorasani MR. Converting dose-length product to effective dose at CT. Radiology. 2008;248(3):995-1003.
Huda, W., Ogden, K. M., & Khorasani, M. R. (2008). Converting dose-length product to effective dose at CT. Radiology, 248(3), 995-1003. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2483071964
Huda W, Ogden KM, Khorasani MR. Converting Dose-length Product to Effective Dose at CT. Radiology. 2008;248(3):995-1003. PubMed PMID: 18710988.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Converting dose-length product to effective dose at CT. AU - Huda,Walter, AU - Ogden,Kent M, AU - Khorasani,Mohammad R, PY - 2008/8/20/pubmed PY - 2008/9/16/medline PY - 2008/8/20/entrez SP - 995 EP - 1003 JF - Radiology JO - Radiology VL - 248 IS - 3 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine effective dose (ED) per unit dose-length product (DLP) conversion factors for computed tomographic (CT) dosimetry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A CT dosimetry spreadsheet was used to compute patient ED values and corresponding DLP values. The ratio of ED to DLP was determined with 16-section CT scanners from four vendors, as well as with five models from one manufacturer that spanned more than 25 years. ED-to-DLP ratios were determined for 2-cm scan lengths along the patient axis, as well as for typical scan lengths encountered at head and body CT examinations. The dependence of the ratio of ED to DLP on x-ray tube voltage (in kilovolts) was investigated, and the values obtained with the spreadsheet were compared with those obtained by using two other commercially available CT dosimetry software packages. RESULTS: For 2-cm scan lengths, changes in the scan region resulted in differences to ED of a factor of 30, but much lower variation was obtained for typical scan lengths at clinical head and body imaging. Inter- and intramanufacturer differences for ED/DLP were generally small. Representative values of ED/DLP at 120 kV were 2.2 microSv/mGy x cm (head scans), 5.4 microSv/mGy x cm (cervical spine scans), and 18 microSv/mGy x cm (body scans). For head scans, ED/DLP was approximately independent of x-ray tube voltage, but for body scans, the increase from 80 to 140 kV increased the ratio of ED to DLP by approximately 25%. Agreement in ED/DLP data for all three software packages was generally very good, except for cervical spine examinations where one software package determined an ED/DLP ratio that was approximately double that of the other two. CONCLUSION: This article describes a method of providing CT users with a practical and reliable estimate of adult patient EDs by using the DLP displayed on the CT console at the end of any given examination. SN - 1527-1315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18710988/Converting_dose_length_product_to_effective_dose_at_CT_ L2 - https://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiol.2483071964?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -