Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The effects of evening primrose oil, safflower oil and paraffin on plasma fatty acid levels in humans: choice of an appropriate placebo for clinical studies on primrose oil.

Abstract

In a number of diseases, plasma levels of linoleic acid are normal or elevated while those of gamma-linolenic acid (18:3n-6, GLA) and further metabolites are below normal. Evening primrose oil (EPO), similar to safflower oil (SFO) except that it contains 8-9% of 18:3n-6, has been proposed as a therapeutic agent in these diseases, such as atopic eczema. There is argument as to whether an appropriate placebo for clinical studies on EPO should be an inert material such as paraffin, or a linoleic acid--containing oil such as SFO. We have therefore compared in normal humans the effects on plasma fatty acids of administering EPO, SFO and paraffin for 10 days. Paraffin had no effect on any fatty acid in any fraction. EPO raised the level of 20:3n-6 (dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, DGLA) the immediate metabolite of GLA but had no significant effect on arachidonic acid. In surprising contrast, SFO raised the levels of linoleic and of arachidonic acids, without raising those of DGLA. This suggests that linoleic acid may be rapidly converted to arachidonic acid by a tightly linked enzyme sequence: GLA, in contrast, may be rapidly converted to DGLA but then only slowly on to arachidonic acid. These results are consistent with recent in vitro observations by others on rat hepatocytes and human fibroblasts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Efamol Research Institute, Kentville, Nova Scotia, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1871175

Citation

Horrobin, D F., et al. "The Effects of Evening Primrose Oil, Safflower Oil and Paraffin On Plasma Fatty Acid Levels in Humans: Choice of an Appropriate Placebo for Clinical Studies On Primrose Oil." Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, vol. 42, no. 4, 1991, pp. 245-9.
Horrobin DF, Ells KM, Morse-Fisher N, et al. The effects of evening primrose oil, safflower oil and paraffin on plasma fatty acid levels in humans: choice of an appropriate placebo for clinical studies on primrose oil. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 1991;42(4):245-9.
Horrobin, D. F., Ells, K. M., Morse-Fisher, N., & Manku, M. S. (1991). The effects of evening primrose oil, safflower oil and paraffin on plasma fatty acid levels in humans: choice of an appropriate placebo for clinical studies on primrose oil. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes, and Essential Fatty Acids, 42(4), pp. 245-9.
Horrobin DF, et al. The Effects of Evening Primrose Oil, Safflower Oil and Paraffin On Plasma Fatty Acid Levels in Humans: Choice of an Appropriate Placebo for Clinical Studies On Primrose Oil. Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids. 1991;42(4):245-9. PubMed PMID: 1871175.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effects of evening primrose oil, safflower oil and paraffin on plasma fatty acid levels in humans: choice of an appropriate placebo for clinical studies on primrose oil. AU - Horrobin,D F, AU - Ells,K M, AU - Morse-Fisher,N, AU - Manku,M S, PY - 1991/4/1/pubmed PY - 1991/4/1/medline PY - 1991/4/1/entrez SP - 245 EP - 9 JF - Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and essential fatty acids JO - Prostaglandins Leukot. Essent. Fatty Acids VL - 42 IS - 4 N2 - In a number of diseases, plasma levels of linoleic acid are normal or elevated while those of gamma-linolenic acid (18:3n-6, GLA) and further metabolites are below normal. Evening primrose oil (EPO), similar to safflower oil (SFO) except that it contains 8-9% of 18:3n-6, has been proposed as a therapeutic agent in these diseases, such as atopic eczema. There is argument as to whether an appropriate placebo for clinical studies on EPO should be an inert material such as paraffin, or a linoleic acid--containing oil such as SFO. We have therefore compared in normal humans the effects on plasma fatty acids of administering EPO, SFO and paraffin for 10 days. Paraffin had no effect on any fatty acid in any fraction. EPO raised the level of 20:3n-6 (dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, DGLA) the immediate metabolite of GLA but had no significant effect on arachidonic acid. In surprising contrast, SFO raised the levels of linoleic and of arachidonic acids, without raising those of DGLA. This suggests that linoleic acid may be rapidly converted to arachidonic acid by a tightly linked enzyme sequence: GLA, in contrast, may be rapidly converted to DGLA but then only slowly on to arachidonic acid. These results are consistent with recent in vitro observations by others on rat hepatocytes and human fibroblasts. SN - 0952-3278 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1871175/The_effects_of_evening_primrose_oil_safflower_oil_and_paraffin_on_plasma_fatty_acid_levels_in_humans:_choice_of_an_appropriate_placebo_for_clinical_studies_on_primrose_oil_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/cholesterolmedicines.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -