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Hormonal responses to resistance exercise in long-term trained and untrained middle-aged men.
J Strength Cond Res. 2008 Sep; 22(5):1617-24.JS

Abstract

This cross-sectional study compared hormonal responses to resistance exercise between trained and untrained men to investigate the adaptations of the endocrine system to long-term strength training in middle-aged men. Twenty-one middle-aged men were recruited for this study and matched into a strength-trained group (SG) (n = 10) and an untrained group (UG) (n = 11). In the SG, the individuals had practiced strength training for hypertrophy for at least 3 years. Upper- and lower-body muscle strength was measured with a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test. Blood samples were collected at rest and after multiple sets of a superset strength training protocol (SSTP), with an intensity of 75% of 1RM values. With these blood samples, the levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), cortisol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were determined. In addition, the TT-to-cortisol ratio and TT-to-SHBG ratio were calculated. There was no difference at rest between groups in hormonal values for TT, FT, DHEA, cortisol, the TT-to-SHBG ratio, and the TT-to-cortisol ratio. There were increases after SSTP in the levels of TT, FT, DHEA, and cortisol and the TT-to-SHBG ratio in the UG, but only FT increased in the SG. The SG demonstrated lower values in the TT-to-SHBG ratio after the training session. These results suggest the presence of alterations in anabolic and catabolic hormonal responses to resistance exercise in long-term trained middle-aged men, with the trained subjects demonstrating lower responsiveness in the hormone values. Long-term trained men seem to require a higher volume of training, at least similar to their daily workout, to stimulate greater hormone responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Exercise Research Laboratory, Physical Education School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil. edcadore@yahoo.com.brNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18714223

Citation

Cadore, Eduardo Lusa, et al. "Hormonal Responses to Resistance Exercise in Long-term Trained and Untrained Middle-aged Men." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 22, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1617-24.
Cadore EL, Lhullier FL, Brentano MA, et al. Hormonal responses to resistance exercise in long-term trained and untrained middle-aged men. J Strength Cond Res. 2008;22(5):1617-24.
Cadore, E. L., Lhullier, F. L., Brentano, M. A., da Silva, E. M., Ambrosini, M. B., Spinelli, R., Silva, R. F., & Kruel, L. F. (2008). Hormonal responses to resistance exercise in long-term trained and untrained middle-aged men. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 22(5), 1617-24. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e31817bd45d
Cadore EL, et al. Hormonal Responses to Resistance Exercise in Long-term Trained and Untrained Middle-aged Men. J Strength Cond Res. 2008;22(5):1617-24. PubMed PMID: 18714223.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hormonal responses to resistance exercise in long-term trained and untrained middle-aged men. AU - Cadore,Eduardo Lusa, AU - Lhullier,Francisco Luiz Rodrigues, AU - Brentano,Michel Arias, AU - da Silva,Eduardo Marczwski, AU - Ambrosini,Melissa Bueno, AU - Spinelli,Rafael, AU - Silva,Rodrigo Ferrari, AU - Kruel,Luiz Fernando Martins, PY - 2008/8/21/pubmed PY - 2009/2/12/medline PY - 2008/8/21/entrez SP - 1617 EP - 24 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 22 IS - 5 N2 - This cross-sectional study compared hormonal responses to resistance exercise between trained and untrained men to investigate the adaptations of the endocrine system to long-term strength training in middle-aged men. Twenty-one middle-aged men were recruited for this study and matched into a strength-trained group (SG) (n = 10) and an untrained group (UG) (n = 11). In the SG, the individuals had practiced strength training for hypertrophy for at least 3 years. Upper- and lower-body muscle strength was measured with a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) test. Blood samples were collected at rest and after multiple sets of a superset strength training protocol (SSTP), with an intensity of 75% of 1RM values. With these blood samples, the levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), cortisol, and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were determined. In addition, the TT-to-cortisol ratio and TT-to-SHBG ratio were calculated. There was no difference at rest between groups in hormonal values for TT, FT, DHEA, cortisol, the TT-to-SHBG ratio, and the TT-to-cortisol ratio. There were increases after SSTP in the levels of TT, FT, DHEA, and cortisol and the TT-to-SHBG ratio in the UG, but only FT increased in the SG. The SG demonstrated lower values in the TT-to-SHBG ratio after the training session. These results suggest the presence of alterations in anabolic and catabolic hormonal responses to resistance exercise in long-term trained middle-aged men, with the trained subjects demonstrating lower responsiveness in the hormone values. Long-term trained men seem to require a higher volume of training, at least similar to their daily workout, to stimulate greater hormone responses. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18714223/Hormonal_responses_to_resistance_exercise_in_long_term_trained_and_untrained_middle_aged_men_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=18714223.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -