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Transgenerational effects of prenatal exposure to the Dutch famine on neonatal adiposity and health in later life.
BJOG 2008; 115(10):1243-9BJOG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Maternal undernutrition during gestation is associated with increased metabolic and cardiovascular disease in the offspring. We investigated whether these effects may persist in subsequent generations.

DESIGN

Historical cohort study.

SETTING

Interview during a clinic or home visit or by telephone.

POPULATION

Men and women born in the Wilhelmina Gasthuis in Amsterdam between November 1943 and February 1947.

METHODS

We interviewed cohort members (F1) born around the time of the 1944-45 Dutch famine, who were exposed or unexposed to famine in utero, about their offspring (F2).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Birthweight, birth length, ponderal index and health in later life (as reported by F1) of the offspring (F2) of 855 participating cohort members, according to F1 famine exposure in utero.

RESULTS

F1 famine exposure in utero did not affect F2 (n = 1496) birthweight, but, among the offspring of famine-exposed F1 women, F2 birth length was decreased (-0.6 cm, P adjusted for F2 gender and birth order = 0.01) and F2 ponderal index was increased (+1.2 kg/m(3), P adjusted for F2 gender and birth order = 0.001). The association remained unaltered after adjusting for possible confounders. The offspring of F1 women who were exposed to famine in utero also had poor health 1.8 (95% CI 1.1-2.7) times more frequently in later life (due to miscellaneous causes) than that of F1 unexposed women.

CONCLUSIONS

We did not find transgenerational effects of prenatal exposure to famine on birthweight nor on cardiovascular and metabolic disease rates. F1 famine exposure in utero was, however, associated with increased F2 neonatal adiposity and poor health in later life. Our findings may imply that the increase in chronic disease after famine exposure in utero is not limited to the F1 generation but persists in the F2 generation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18715409

Citation

Painter, R C., et al. "Transgenerational Effects of Prenatal Exposure to the Dutch Famine On Neonatal Adiposity and Health in Later Life." BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol. 115, no. 10, 2008, pp. 1243-9.
Painter RC, Osmond C, Gluckman P, et al. Transgenerational effects of prenatal exposure to the Dutch famine on neonatal adiposity and health in later life. BJOG. 2008;115(10):1243-9.
Painter, R. C., Osmond, C., Gluckman, P., Hanson, M., Phillips, D. I., & Roseboom, T. J. (2008). Transgenerational effects of prenatal exposure to the Dutch famine on neonatal adiposity and health in later life. BJOG : an International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 115(10), pp. 1243-9. doi:10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01822.x.
Painter RC, et al. Transgenerational Effects of Prenatal Exposure to the Dutch Famine On Neonatal Adiposity and Health in Later Life. BJOG. 2008;115(10):1243-9. PubMed PMID: 18715409.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transgenerational effects of prenatal exposure to the Dutch famine on neonatal adiposity and health in later life. AU - Painter,R C, AU - Osmond,C, AU - Gluckman,P, AU - Hanson,M, AU - Phillips,D I W, AU - Roseboom,T J, PY - 2008/8/22/pubmed PY - 2008/9/16/medline PY - 2008/8/22/entrez SP - 1243 EP - 9 JF - BJOG : an international journal of obstetrics and gynaecology JO - BJOG VL - 115 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Maternal undernutrition during gestation is associated with increased metabolic and cardiovascular disease in the offspring. We investigated whether these effects may persist in subsequent generations. DESIGN: Historical cohort study. SETTING: Interview during a clinic or home visit or by telephone. POPULATION: Men and women born in the Wilhelmina Gasthuis in Amsterdam between November 1943 and February 1947. METHODS: We interviewed cohort members (F1) born around the time of the 1944-45 Dutch famine, who were exposed or unexposed to famine in utero, about their offspring (F2). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Birthweight, birth length, ponderal index and health in later life (as reported by F1) of the offspring (F2) of 855 participating cohort members, according to F1 famine exposure in utero. RESULTS: F1 famine exposure in utero did not affect F2 (n = 1496) birthweight, but, among the offspring of famine-exposed F1 women, F2 birth length was decreased (-0.6 cm, P adjusted for F2 gender and birth order = 0.01) and F2 ponderal index was increased (+1.2 kg/m(3), P adjusted for F2 gender and birth order = 0.001). The association remained unaltered after adjusting for possible confounders. The offspring of F1 women who were exposed to famine in utero also had poor health 1.8 (95% CI 1.1-2.7) times more frequently in later life (due to miscellaneous causes) than that of F1 unexposed women. CONCLUSIONS: We did not find transgenerational effects of prenatal exposure to famine on birthweight nor on cardiovascular and metabolic disease rates. F1 famine exposure in utero was, however, associated with increased F2 neonatal adiposity and poor health in later life. Our findings may imply that the increase in chronic disease after famine exposure in utero is not limited to the F1 generation but persists in the F2 generation. SN - 1471-0528 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18715409/Transgenerational_effects_of_prenatal_exposure_to_the_Dutch_famine_on_neonatal_adiposity_and_health_in_later_life_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2008.01822.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -