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Estimated net acid excretion inversely correlates with urine pH in vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and omnivores.
J Ren Nutr. 2008 Sep; 18(5):456-65.JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Diet affects urine pH and acid-base balance. Both excess acid/alkaline ash (EAA) and estimated net acid excretion (NAE) calculations have been used to estimate the effects of diet on urine pH. This study's goal was to determine if free-living vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and omnivores have increasingly acidic urine, and to assess the ability of EAA and estimated NAE calculations to predict urine pH.

DESIGN

This study used a cross-sectional design.

SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

This study assessed urine samples of 10 vegan, 16 lacto-ovo vegetarian, and 16 healthy omnivorous women in the Boston metropolitan area. Six 3-day food records from each dietary group were analyzed for EAA content and estimated NAE, and correlations with measured urine pH were calculated.

RESULTS

The mean (+/- SD) urine pH was 6.15 +/- 0.40 for vegans, 5.90 +/- 0.36 for lacto-ovo vegetarians, and 5.74 +/- 0.21 for omnivores (analysis of variance, P = .013). Calculated EAA values were not significantly different among the three groups, whereas mean estimated NAE values were significantly different: 17.3 +/- 14.5 mEq/day for vegans, 31.3 +/- 8.5 mEq/day for lacto-ovo vegetarians, and 42.6 +/- 13.2 mEq/day for omnivores (analysis of variance, P = .01). The average deattenuated correlation between urine pH and EAA was 0.333; this value was -0.768 for estimated NAE and urine pH, with a regression equation of pH = 6.33 - 0.014 NAE (P = .02, r = -0.54).

CONCLUSIONS

Habitual diet and estimated NAE calculations indicate the probable ranking of urine pH by dietary groups, and may be used to determine the likely acid-base status of an individual; EAA calculations were not predictive of urine pH.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, Boston, Massachusetts 02111, USA. lynne.ausman@tufts.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18721741

Citation

Ausman, Lynne M., et al. "Estimated Net Acid Excretion Inversely Correlates With Urine pH in Vegans, Lacto-ovo Vegetarians, and Omnivores." Journal of Renal Nutrition : the Official Journal of the Council On Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation, vol. 18, no. 5, 2008, pp. 456-65.
Ausman LM, Oliver LM, Goldin BR, et al. Estimated net acid excretion inversely correlates with urine pH in vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and omnivores. J Ren Nutr. 2008;18(5):456-65.
Ausman, L. M., Oliver, L. M., Goldin, B. R., Woods, M. N., Gorbach, S. L., & Dwyer, J. T. (2008). Estimated net acid excretion inversely correlates with urine pH in vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and omnivores. Journal of Renal Nutrition : the Official Journal of the Council On Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation, 18(5), 456-65. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.jrn.2008.04.007
Ausman LM, et al. Estimated Net Acid Excretion Inversely Correlates With Urine pH in Vegans, Lacto-ovo Vegetarians, and Omnivores. J Ren Nutr. 2008;18(5):456-65. PubMed PMID: 18721741.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Estimated net acid excretion inversely correlates with urine pH in vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and omnivores. AU - Ausman,Lynne M, AU - Oliver,Lauren M, AU - Goldin,Barry R, AU - Woods,Margo N, AU - Gorbach,Sherwood L, AU - Dwyer,Johanna T, PY - 2007/05/03/received PY - 2008/8/30/pubmed PY - 2008/12/18/medline PY - 2008/8/30/entrez SP - 456 EP - 65 JF - Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation JO - J Ren Nutr VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Diet affects urine pH and acid-base balance. Both excess acid/alkaline ash (EAA) and estimated net acid excretion (NAE) calculations have been used to estimate the effects of diet on urine pH. This study's goal was to determine if free-living vegans, lacto-ovo vegetarians, and omnivores have increasingly acidic urine, and to assess the ability of EAA and estimated NAE calculations to predict urine pH. DESIGN: This study used a cross-sectional design. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: This study assessed urine samples of 10 vegan, 16 lacto-ovo vegetarian, and 16 healthy omnivorous women in the Boston metropolitan area. Six 3-day food records from each dietary group were analyzed for EAA content and estimated NAE, and correlations with measured urine pH were calculated. RESULTS: The mean (+/- SD) urine pH was 6.15 +/- 0.40 for vegans, 5.90 +/- 0.36 for lacto-ovo vegetarians, and 5.74 +/- 0.21 for omnivores (analysis of variance, P = .013). Calculated EAA values were not significantly different among the three groups, whereas mean estimated NAE values were significantly different: 17.3 +/- 14.5 mEq/day for vegans, 31.3 +/- 8.5 mEq/day for lacto-ovo vegetarians, and 42.6 +/- 13.2 mEq/day for omnivores (analysis of variance, P = .01). The average deattenuated correlation between urine pH and EAA was 0.333; this value was -0.768 for estimated NAE and urine pH, with a regression equation of pH = 6.33 - 0.014 NAE (P = .02, r = -0.54). CONCLUSIONS: Habitual diet and estimated NAE calculations indicate the probable ranking of urine pH by dietary groups, and may be used to determine the likely acid-base status of an individual; EAA calculations were not predictive of urine pH. SN - 1532-8503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18721741/Estimated_net_acid_excretion_inversely_correlates_with_urine_pH_in_vegans_lacto_ovo_vegetarians_and_omnivores_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1051-2276(08)00302-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -