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Covariance between psychological and endocrine responses to pharmacological challenge and psychosocial stress: a question of timing.
Psychosom Med. 2008 Sep; 70(7):787-96.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test if the covariance of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and subjective-psychological responses to stress is dependent on different dynamics of these systems. Although stress theories typically assume substantial correlations of psychological and endocrine stress responses, studies have produced inconsistent results. One reason for this might be imperfect coupling of the different stress response systems. However, inconsistent correlations might also be a result of different on-/offsets of these stress responses, i.e., specific dynamics of the systems.

METHODS

HPA axis indicators and subjective-psychological states were repeatedly and synchronously measured in a pharmacological challenge test (injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone and infusion of arginine vasopressin; Study 1; n = 42) and a psychosocial stress situation (Trier Social Stress Test; Study 2; n = 219). Cross-correlation analysis was used to test for lag effects in HPA axis reactivity and psychoendocrine responses.

RESULTS

Analyses revealed high cross-correlations of adrenocorticotropic hormone with cortisol responses (up to r = .80 in Study 1 and r = .56 in Study 2) and positive associations of psychological with endocrine stress responses (up to r = .48 in Study 1 and r = .54 in Study 2) at nonzero lags. Subjective-psychological responses preceded HPA axis responses. Moreover, high levels of cortisol were associated with lower later levels of anxiety and activation.

CONCLUSIONS

The findings suggest that psychoendocrine stress responses are more closely coupled than previous studies suggested. Due to different dynamics of the systems, endocrine responses lag behind psychological responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK. wolff.schlotz@soton.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18725434

Citation

Schlotz, Wolff, et al. "Covariance Between Psychological and Endocrine Responses to Pharmacological Challenge and Psychosocial Stress: a Question of Timing." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 70, no. 7, 2008, pp. 787-96.
Schlotz W, Kumsta R, Layes I, et al. Covariance between psychological and endocrine responses to pharmacological challenge and psychosocial stress: a question of timing. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(7):787-96.
Schlotz, W., Kumsta, R., Layes, I., Entringer, S., Jones, A., & Wüst, S. (2008). Covariance between psychological and endocrine responses to pharmacological challenge and psychosocial stress: a question of timing. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70(7), 787-96. https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181810658
Schlotz W, et al. Covariance Between Psychological and Endocrine Responses to Pharmacological Challenge and Psychosocial Stress: a Question of Timing. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(7):787-96. PubMed PMID: 18725434.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Covariance between psychological and endocrine responses to pharmacological challenge and psychosocial stress: a question of timing. AU - Schlotz,Wolff, AU - Kumsta,Robert, AU - Layes,Irmgard, AU - Entringer,Sonja, AU - Jones,Alexander, AU - Wüst,Stefan, Y1 - 2008/08/25/ PY - 2008/8/30/pubmed PY - 2009/1/14/medline PY - 2008/8/30/entrez SP - 787 EP - 96 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 70 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test if the covariance of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and subjective-psychological responses to stress is dependent on different dynamics of these systems. Although stress theories typically assume substantial correlations of psychological and endocrine stress responses, studies have produced inconsistent results. One reason for this might be imperfect coupling of the different stress response systems. However, inconsistent correlations might also be a result of different on-/offsets of these stress responses, i.e., specific dynamics of the systems. METHODS: HPA axis indicators and subjective-psychological states were repeatedly and synchronously measured in a pharmacological challenge test (injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone and infusion of arginine vasopressin; Study 1; n = 42) and a psychosocial stress situation (Trier Social Stress Test; Study 2; n = 219). Cross-correlation analysis was used to test for lag effects in HPA axis reactivity and psychoendocrine responses. RESULTS: Analyses revealed high cross-correlations of adrenocorticotropic hormone with cortisol responses (up to r = .80 in Study 1 and r = .56 in Study 2) and positive associations of psychological with endocrine stress responses (up to r = .48 in Study 1 and r = .54 in Study 2) at nonzero lags. Subjective-psychological responses preceded HPA axis responses. Moreover, high levels of cortisol were associated with lower later levels of anxiety and activation. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest that psychoendocrine stress responses are more closely coupled than previous studies suggested. Due to different dynamics of the systems, endocrine responses lag behind psychological responses. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18725434/Covariance_between_psychological_and_endocrine_responses_to_pharmacological_challenge_and_psychosocial_stress:_a_question_of_timing_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181810658 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -