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Prospective study of dietary fiber, whole grain foods, and small intestinal cancer.
Gastroenterology. 2008 Oct; 135(4):1163-7.G

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Although a number of epidemiologic studies have found dietary fiber and whole grains to be inversely associated with colorectal cancer incidence, studies of dietary and other risk factors for small intestinal cancer have been sparse and all of a case-control design. We conducted a prospective cohort study to determine the relationship between intake of dietary fiber/whole grains and the incidence of small intestinal cancer.

METHODS

We analyzed dietary data collected in 1995 and 1996 from 293,703 men and 198,618 women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to estimate relative risk (RR) and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for quintiles of dietary fiber and whole grain intake.

RESULTS

Through 2003, 165 individuals developed small intestinal cancers. Dietary fiber/whole grain intake was generally associated with a lower risk of small intestinal cancer. The multivariate RRs (95% CIs; 5th vs 1st intake quintile) were 0.79 (0.43-1.44; P trend, .41) for total dietary fiber, 0.51 (0.29-0.89; P trend, .01) for fiber from grains, and 0.59 (0.33-1.05; P trend, .06) for whole grain foods.

CONCLUSIONS

Intake of fiber from grains and whole-grain foods was inversely associated with small intestinal cancer incidence; the RR values were consistent with those from the same dietary factors for large bowel cancer in this cohort. In conjunction with the anatomic and physiologic commonalities of the large and small bowel, as well as the mutually increased risks for second cancer for both organs, grain fiber and whole grain foods seem to protect against lower gastrointestinal cancers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852, USA. schatzka@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18727930

Citation

Schatzkin, Arthur, et al. "Prospective Study of Dietary Fiber, Whole Grain Foods, and Small Intestinal Cancer." Gastroenterology, vol. 135, no. 4, 2008, pp. 1163-7.
Schatzkin A, Park Y, Leitzmann MF, et al. Prospective study of dietary fiber, whole grain foods, and small intestinal cancer. Gastroenterology. 2008;135(4):1163-7.
Schatzkin, A., Park, Y., Leitzmann, M. F., Hollenbeck, A. R., & Cross, A. J. (2008). Prospective study of dietary fiber, whole grain foods, and small intestinal cancer. Gastroenterology, 135(4), 1163-7. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2008.07.015
Schatzkin A, et al. Prospective Study of Dietary Fiber, Whole Grain Foods, and Small Intestinal Cancer. Gastroenterology. 2008;135(4):1163-7. PubMed PMID: 18727930.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of dietary fiber, whole grain foods, and small intestinal cancer. AU - Schatzkin,Arthur, AU - Park,Yikyung, AU - Leitzmann,Michael F, AU - Hollenbeck,Albert R, AU - Cross,Amanda J, Y1 - 2008/07/17/ PY - 2008/05/12/received PY - 2008/07/07/revised PY - 2008/07/10/accepted PY - 2008/8/30/pubmed PY - 2008/11/15/medline PY - 2008/8/30/entrez SP - 1163 EP - 7 JF - Gastroenterology JO - Gastroenterology VL - 135 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Although a number of epidemiologic studies have found dietary fiber and whole grains to be inversely associated with colorectal cancer incidence, studies of dietary and other risk factors for small intestinal cancer have been sparse and all of a case-control design. We conducted a prospective cohort study to determine the relationship between intake of dietary fiber/whole grains and the incidence of small intestinal cancer. METHODS: We analyzed dietary data collected in 1995 and 1996 from 293,703 men and 198,618 women in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards models to estimate relative risk (RR) and 2-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for quintiles of dietary fiber and whole grain intake. RESULTS: Through 2003, 165 individuals developed small intestinal cancers. Dietary fiber/whole grain intake was generally associated with a lower risk of small intestinal cancer. The multivariate RRs (95% CIs; 5th vs 1st intake quintile) were 0.79 (0.43-1.44; P trend, .41) for total dietary fiber, 0.51 (0.29-0.89; P trend, .01) for fiber from grains, and 0.59 (0.33-1.05; P trend, .06) for whole grain foods. CONCLUSIONS: Intake of fiber from grains and whole-grain foods was inversely associated with small intestinal cancer incidence; the RR values were consistent with those from the same dietary factors for large bowel cancer in this cohort. In conjunction with the anatomic and physiologic commonalities of the large and small bowel, as well as the mutually increased risks for second cancer for both organs, grain fiber and whole grain foods seem to protect against lower gastrointestinal cancers. SN - 1528-0012 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18727930/Prospective_study_of_dietary_fiber_whole_grain_foods_and_small_intestinal_cancer_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -