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Affective ratings and startle modulation in people with nonclinical depression.
Emotion. 2008 Aug; 8(4):552-9.E

Abstract

This study tested predictions based on the emotion context insensitivity (ECI) hypothesis of Rottenberg, Gross, and Gotlib (2005) that a nonclinical sample of people with depressive symptoms would show reduced responses to both positive and negative stimuli relative to people without depression and would show an enhanced response to novelty. Seventy individuals completed diagnostic questionnaires, made ratings of 21 affectively valenced pictures, and then viewed the same 21 pictures and 21 novel pictures while startle blink responses were recorded from electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi. People with scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh, 1961) indicative of depression demonstrated a lack of affective startle modulation compared to the nondepression group. For all participants, the startle response was larger for novel pictures than for previously viewed pictures, but scores on the BDI were not related to response to novelty. Taken together, the results suggest that nonclinical depression is associated with a lack of affective modulation of startle, as has been shown for clinical depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, St. John's University, Jamaica, NY 11439, USA. malek.mneimne@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18729585

Citation

Mneimne, Malek, et al. "Affective Ratings and Startle Modulation in People With Nonclinical Depression." Emotion (Washington, D.C.), vol. 8, no. 4, 2008, pp. 552-9.
Mneimne M, McDermut W, Powers AS. Affective ratings and startle modulation in people with nonclinical depression. Emotion. 2008;8(4):552-9.
Mneimne, M., McDermut, W., & Powers, A. S. (2008). Affective ratings and startle modulation in people with nonclinical depression. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 8(4), 552-9. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012827
Mneimne M, McDermut W, Powers AS. Affective Ratings and Startle Modulation in People With Nonclinical Depression. Emotion. 2008;8(4):552-9. PubMed PMID: 18729585.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Affective ratings and startle modulation in people with nonclinical depression. AU - Mneimne,Malek, AU - McDermut,Wilson, AU - Powers,Alice Schade, PY - 2008/8/30/pubmed PY - 2008/11/19/medline PY - 2008/8/30/entrez SP - 552 EP - 9 JF - Emotion (Washington, D.C.) JO - Emotion VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - This study tested predictions based on the emotion context insensitivity (ECI) hypothesis of Rottenberg, Gross, and Gotlib (2005) that a nonclinical sample of people with depressive symptoms would show reduced responses to both positive and negative stimuli relative to people without depression and would show an enhanced response to novelty. Seventy individuals completed diagnostic questionnaires, made ratings of 21 affectively valenced pictures, and then viewed the same 21 pictures and 21 novel pictures while startle blink responses were recorded from electromyographic activity of the orbicularis oculi. People with scores on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh, 1961) indicative of depression demonstrated a lack of affective startle modulation compared to the nondepression group. For all participants, the startle response was larger for novel pictures than for previously viewed pictures, but scores on the BDI were not related to response to novelty. Taken together, the results suggest that nonclinical depression is associated with a lack of affective modulation of startle, as has been shown for clinical depression. SN - 1528-3542 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18729585/Affective_ratings_and_startle_modulation_in_people_with_nonclinical_depression_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/emo/8/4/552 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -