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Alcohol consumption, type of alcoholic beverage and risk of colorectal cancer at specific subsites.

Abstract

Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated associations between total alcohol consumption, specific alcoholic beverage consumption and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) according to anatomical subsite. Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Analyses were performed on 2,323 CRC cases, available after 13.3 years of follow-up. Compared to abstaining, alcohol consumption of >/=30.0 g/day ( approximately 3 alcoholic drinks) was positively associated with the risk of CRC (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.06-1.65). Analyses restricted to subjects who reported to have consumed equal amounts of alcohol 5 years before baseline compared to baseline, showed elevated risk estimates for consumers of >/=30.0 g of total alcohol per day as well (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.16-2.01). Suggestive of a subsite-specific effect, cancer risk seemed to increase from proximal colon through rectum; HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.85-1.96 for proximal colon cancer, HR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.94-2.11 for distal colon cancer, HR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.03-4.18 for rectosigmoid cancer and HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.08-2.64 for rectal cancer. No associations were observed between consumption of alcoholic beverages and CRC risk when compared with the nondrinkers of the specific beverage and after adjustment for total alcohol intake. No evidence was found for sex-specific effects of alcohol and alcoholic beverages. In conclusion, our data showed a positive association between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC, which seemed to be mainly explained by the alcoholic content of alcoholic beverages, rather than other constituents. Also, cancer risk may vary according to anatomical subsite.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. brenda.bongaerts@epid.unimaas.nl

    , , ,

    Source

    International journal of cancer 123:10 2008 Nov 15 pg 2411-7

    MeSH

    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcoholic Beverages
    Cohort Studies
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Netherlands
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18752250

    Citation

    Bongaerts, Brenda W C., et al. "Alcohol Consumption, Type of Alcoholic Beverage and Risk of Colorectal Cancer at Specific Subsites." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 123, no. 10, 2008, pp. 2411-7.
    Bongaerts BW, van den Brandt PA, Goldbohm RA, et al. Alcohol consumption, type of alcoholic beverage and risk of colorectal cancer at specific subsites. Int J Cancer. 2008;123(10):2411-7.
    Bongaerts, B. W., van den Brandt, P. A., Goldbohm, R. A., de Goeij, A. F., & Weijenberg, M. P. (2008). Alcohol consumption, type of alcoholic beverage and risk of colorectal cancer at specific subsites. International Journal of Cancer, 123(10), pp. 2411-7. doi:10.1002/ijc.23774.
    Bongaerts BW, et al. Alcohol Consumption, Type of Alcoholic Beverage and Risk of Colorectal Cancer at Specific Subsites. Int J Cancer. 2008 Nov 15;123(10):2411-7. PubMed PMID: 18752250.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption, type of alcoholic beverage and risk of colorectal cancer at specific subsites. AU - Bongaerts,Brenda W C, AU - van den Brandt,Piet A, AU - Goldbohm,R Alexandra, AU - de Goeij,Anton F P M, AU - Weijenberg,Matty P, PY - 2008/8/30/pubmed PY - 2008/10/11/medline PY - 2008/8/30/entrez SP - 2411 EP - 7 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 123 IS - 10 N2 - Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated associations between total alcohol consumption, specific alcoholic beverage consumption and risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) according to anatomical subsite. Hazard Ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Analyses were performed on 2,323 CRC cases, available after 13.3 years of follow-up. Compared to abstaining, alcohol consumption of >/=30.0 g/day ( approximately 3 alcoholic drinks) was positively associated with the risk of CRC (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.06-1.65). Analyses restricted to subjects who reported to have consumed equal amounts of alcohol 5 years before baseline compared to baseline, showed elevated risk estimates for consumers of >/=30.0 g of total alcohol per day as well (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.16-2.01). Suggestive of a subsite-specific effect, cancer risk seemed to increase from proximal colon through rectum; HR: 1.29, 95% CI: 0.85-1.96 for proximal colon cancer, HR: 1.41, 95% CI: 0.94-2.11 for distal colon cancer, HR: 2.07, 95% CI: 1.03-4.18 for rectosigmoid cancer and HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.08-2.64 for rectal cancer. No associations were observed between consumption of alcoholic beverages and CRC risk when compared with the nondrinkers of the specific beverage and after adjustment for total alcohol intake. No evidence was found for sex-specific effects of alcohol and alcoholic beverages. In conclusion, our data showed a positive association between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC, which seemed to be mainly explained by the alcoholic content of alcoholic beverages, rather than other constituents. Also, cancer risk may vary according to anatomical subsite. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18752250/Alcohol_consumption_type_of_alcoholic_beverage_and_risk_of_colorectal_cancer_at_specific_subsites_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.23774 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -