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C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study.
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil 2008; 15(5):594-8EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors. It is not clear whether CRP predicts CVD independent of IR.

DESIGN

Prospective population-based study.

METHODS

Two thousand three hundred and fifty-seven Danish men and women, recruited from the general population, aged 41-72 years, without major CVD at baseline were studied. Traditional and new risk factors were recorded at baseline. CRP was determined by a high-sensitivity assay, and IR was determined by the homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) method.

RESULTS

Over a median follow-up of 9.4 years, the incidence of the prespecified CV event, defined as the composite event of CV death, nonfatal ischaemic heart disease and nonfatal stroke, amounted to 222 cases. In Cox proportional-hazard models, adjusted for age, sex, smoking habit, total cholesterol, waist circumference, levels of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, physical activity and HOMA-IR, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of a CV event was 1.33 (1.14-1.55; P<0.001) per standard deviation increase in log-transformed CRP level. In the same model, the hazard ratio of a CV event was 1.11 (1.02-1.21; P<0.05) per standard deviation increase in HOMA-IR level.

CONCLUSION

In a general Danish population free of major CVD at baseline, both CRP and IR were significantly related to risk of CVD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine M, Glostrup University Hospital, Ndr. Ringvej, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark. jj@heart.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18753952

Citation

Jeppesen, Jørgen, et al. "C-reactive Protein, Insulin Resistance and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: a Population-based Study." European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation : Official Journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups On Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology, vol. 15, no. 5, 2008, pp. 594-8.
Jeppesen J, Hansen TW, Olsen MH, et al. C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2008;15(5):594-8.
Jeppesen, J., Hansen, T. W., Olsen, M. H., Rasmussen, S., Ibsen, H., Torp-Pedersen, C., ... Madsbad, S. (2008). C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study. European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation : Official Journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups On Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology, 15(5), pp. 594-8. doi:10.1097/HJR.0b013e328308bb8b.
Jeppesen J, et al. C-reactive Protein, Insulin Resistance and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: a Population-based Study. Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2008;15(5):594-8. PubMed PMID: 18753952.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - C-reactive protein, insulin resistance and risk of cardiovascular disease: a population-based study. AU - Jeppesen,Jørgen, AU - Hansen,Tine W, AU - Olsen,Michael H, AU - Rasmussen,Susanne, AU - Ibsen,Hans, AU - Torp-Pedersen,Christian, AU - Hildebrandt,Per R, AU - Madsbad,Sten, PY - 2008/8/30/pubmed PY - 2009/1/10/medline PY - 2008/8/30/entrez SP - 594 EP - 8 JF - European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology JO - Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP), a marker of inflammation, and insulin resistance (IR), a metabolic disorder, are closely related. CRP and IR have both been identified as significant risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after adjustment for conventional CVD risk factors. It is not clear whether CRP predicts CVD independent of IR. DESIGN: Prospective population-based study. METHODS: Two thousand three hundred and fifty-seven Danish men and women, recruited from the general population, aged 41-72 years, without major CVD at baseline were studied. Traditional and new risk factors were recorded at baseline. CRP was determined by a high-sensitivity assay, and IR was determined by the homoeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) method. RESULTS: Over a median follow-up of 9.4 years, the incidence of the prespecified CV event, defined as the composite event of CV death, nonfatal ischaemic heart disease and nonfatal stroke, amounted to 222 cases. In Cox proportional-hazard models, adjusted for age, sex, smoking habit, total cholesterol, waist circumference, levels of triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, physical activity and HOMA-IR, the hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) of a CV event was 1.33 (1.14-1.55; P<0.001) per standard deviation increase in log-transformed CRP level. In the same model, the hazard ratio of a CV event was 1.11 (1.02-1.21; P<0.05) per standard deviation increase in HOMA-IR level. CONCLUSION: In a general Danish population free of major CVD at baseline, both CRP and IR were significantly related to risk of CVD. SN - 1741-8267 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18753952/C_reactive_protein_insulin_resistance_and_risk_of_cardiovascular_disease:_a_population_based_study_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&amp;PAGE=linkout&amp;SEARCH=18753952.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -