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Glucosamine.
Am Fam Physician 2008; 78(4):471-6AF

Abstract

Glucosamine is one of the most popular dietary supplements sold in the United States. Most clinical trials have focused on its use in osteoarthritis of the knee. The reported adverse effects have been relatively well studied and are generally uncommon and minor. No significant supplement-drug interactions involving glucosamine have been reported. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial, the largest randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving the supplement, still has not confirmed whether glucosamine is effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Despite conflicting results in studies, there is no clear evidence to recommend against its use. If physicians have patients who wish to try glucosamine, it would be reasonable to support a 60-day trial of glucosamine sulfate, especially in those at high risk of secondary effects from other accepted treatments. The decision to continue therapy can then be left to patients on an individual basis, while the physician monitors for possible adverse effects. Glucosamine should be used with caution in patients who have shellfish allergies or asthma, and in those taking diabetes medications or warfarin.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Beth Israel Department of Family Medicine, Beth Israel Center for Health and Healing, New York, New York 10016, USA. stephendahmermd@yahoo.comNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18756654

Citation

Dahmer, Stephen, and Robert M. Schiller. "Glucosamine." American Family Physician, vol. 78, no. 4, 2008, pp. 471-6.
Dahmer S, Schiller RM. Glucosamine. Am Fam Physician. 2008;78(4):471-6.
Dahmer, S., & Schiller, R. M. (2008). Glucosamine. American Family Physician, 78(4), pp. 471-6.
Dahmer S, Schiller RM. Glucosamine. Am Fam Physician. 2008 Aug 15;78(4):471-6. PubMed PMID: 18756654.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Glucosamine. AU - Dahmer,Stephen, AU - Schiller,Robert M, PY - 2008/9/2/pubmed PY - 2008/9/20/medline PY - 2008/9/2/entrez SP - 471 EP - 6 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 78 IS - 4 N2 - Glucosamine is one of the most popular dietary supplements sold in the United States. Most clinical trials have focused on its use in osteoarthritis of the knee. The reported adverse effects have been relatively well studied and are generally uncommon and minor. No significant supplement-drug interactions involving glucosamine have been reported. The National Institutes of Health-sponsored Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial, the largest randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study involving the supplement, still has not confirmed whether glucosamine is effective in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Despite conflicting results in studies, there is no clear evidence to recommend against its use. If physicians have patients who wish to try glucosamine, it would be reasonable to support a 60-day trial of glucosamine sulfate, especially in those at high risk of secondary effects from other accepted treatments. The decision to continue therapy can then be left to patients on an individual basis, while the physician monitors for possible adverse effects. Glucosamine should be used with caution in patients who have shellfish allergies or asthma, and in those taking diabetes medications or warfarin. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18756654/Glucosamine_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=18756654 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -