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Cluster of eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in French policemen troop returning from the Pacific Islands.
Travel Med Infect Dis. 2008 Sep; 6(5):301-4.TM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis are reported rarely, even in regions of endemic infestation with the roundworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis, such as the Pacific Basin. We report a cluster of eosinophilic meningitis presumably attributable to A. cantonensis among French policemen returning from French Polynesia.

METHODS

A retrospective cohort study among French policemen who had stayed in Tahiti was conducted using a clinical definition of eosinophilic meningitis that included severe headache within 30 days after return and eosinophilia, and who consumed locally exotic ethnic dishes with uncooked freshwater prawns.

RESULTS

Five persons met the case definition for eosinophilic meningitis. Corticosteroid therapy associated with antihelminthic regimen led to improvement of symptoms in one patient. Other patients were treated with albendazole alone. All patients recovered.

CONCLUSION

Among travellers at risk, the presence of severe headache and eosinophilia combined with a consistent exposure history to exotic food should alert to the possibility of A. cantonensis infestation. Travellers should be aware of the risk of infection associated with eating exotic ethnic dishes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Travel Clinics and Tropical Disease Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases and Tropical Medicine, University Hospital Center, Bordeaux F-33075, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18760253

Citation

Malvy, Denis, et al. "Cluster of Eosinophilic Meningitis Attributable to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Infection in French Policemen Troop Returning From the Pacific Islands." Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, vol. 6, no. 5, 2008, pp. 301-4.
Malvy D, Ezzedine K, Receveur MC, et al. Cluster of eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in French policemen troop returning from the Pacific Islands. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2008;6(5):301-4.
Malvy, D., Ezzedine, K., Receveur, M. C., Pistone, T., Crevon, L., Lemardeley, P., & Josse, R. (2008). Cluster of eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in French policemen troop returning from the Pacific Islands. Travel Medicine and Infectious Disease, 6(5), 301-4. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tmaid.2008.06.003
Malvy D, et al. Cluster of Eosinophilic Meningitis Attributable to Angiostrongylus Cantonensis Infection in French Policemen Troop Returning From the Pacific Islands. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2008;6(5):301-4. PubMed PMID: 18760253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cluster of eosinophilic meningitis attributable to Angiostrongylus cantonensis infection in French policemen troop returning from the Pacific Islands. AU - Malvy,Denis, AU - Ezzedine,Khaled, AU - Receveur,Marie-Catherine, AU - Pistone,Thierry, AU - Crevon,Lionel, AU - Lemardeley,Pierre, AU - Josse,Richard, Y1 - 2008/08/03/ PY - 2008/04/22/received PY - 2008/06/05/revised PY - 2008/06/12/accepted PY - 2008/9/2/pubmed PY - 2008/11/14/medline PY - 2008/9/2/entrez SP - 301 EP - 4 JF - Travel medicine and infectious disease JO - Travel Med Infect Dis VL - 6 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Outbreaks of eosinophilic meningitis are reported rarely, even in regions of endemic infestation with the roundworm Angiostrongylus cantonensis, such as the Pacific Basin. We report a cluster of eosinophilic meningitis presumably attributable to A. cantonensis among French policemen returning from French Polynesia. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study among French policemen who had stayed in Tahiti was conducted using a clinical definition of eosinophilic meningitis that included severe headache within 30 days after return and eosinophilia, and who consumed locally exotic ethnic dishes with uncooked freshwater prawns. RESULTS: Five persons met the case definition for eosinophilic meningitis. Corticosteroid therapy associated with antihelminthic regimen led to improvement of symptoms in one patient. Other patients were treated with albendazole alone. All patients recovered. CONCLUSION: Among travellers at risk, the presence of severe headache and eosinophilia combined with a consistent exposure history to exotic food should alert to the possibility of A. cantonensis infestation. Travellers should be aware of the risk of infection associated with eating exotic ethnic dishes. SN - 1477-8939 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18760253/Cluster_of_eosinophilic_meningitis_attributable_to_Angiostrongylus_cantonensis_infection_in_French_policemen_troop_returning_from_the_Pacific_Islands_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1477-8939(08)00091-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -