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Post-retrieval beta-adrenergic receptor blockade: effects on extinction and reconsolidation of cocaine-cue memories.
Learn Mem. 2008 Sep; 15(9):643-8.LM

Abstract

Contexts and discrete cues associated with drug-taking are often responsible for relapse among addicts. Animal models have shown that interference with the reconsolidation of drug-cue memories can reduce seeking of drugs or drug-paired stimuli. One such model is conditioned place preference (CPP) in which an animal is trained to associate a particular environment with the rewarding effects of a drug. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that intra-nucleus accumbens core infusions of a MEK inhibitor can interfere with reconsolidation of these drug-cue memories. A question that remains is whether post-retrieval drug effects on subsequent memories represent an interference with reconsolidation processes or rather a facilitation of extinction. In this experiment, we explore the effect of post-retrieval injections of propranolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on reconsolidation and extinction of cocaine CPP. After acquisition of cocaine CPP, animals were given post-retrieval propranolol injections once or each day during a protocol of unreinforced preference tests, until the animals showed no preference for the previously cocaine-paired environment. Following a cocaine priming injection, the animals that received daily post-test propranolol injections did not reinstate their preference for the drug-paired side. In contrast, a single post-retrieval propranolol injection followed by multiple days of unreinforced preference tests failed to blunt subsequent cocaine reinstatement of the memory. These data suggest that daily post-retrieval systemic injections of propranolol decrease the conditioned preference by interfering with reconsolidation of the memory for the association between the drug-paired side and the reinforcing effects of the drug, rather than facilitating new extinction learning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, University of California, Irvine, California 92697, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18772251

Citation

Fricks-Gleason, Ashley N., and John F. Marshall. "Post-retrieval Beta-adrenergic Receptor Blockade: Effects On Extinction and Reconsolidation of Cocaine-cue Memories." Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.), vol. 15, no. 9, 2008, pp. 643-8.
Fricks-Gleason AN, Marshall JF. Post-retrieval beta-adrenergic receptor blockade: effects on extinction and reconsolidation of cocaine-cue memories. Learn Mem. 2008;15(9):643-8.
Fricks-Gleason, A. N., & Marshall, J. F. (2008). Post-retrieval beta-adrenergic receptor blockade: effects on extinction and reconsolidation of cocaine-cue memories. Learning & Memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.), 15(9), 643-8. https://doi.org/10.1101/lm.1054608
Fricks-Gleason AN, Marshall JF. Post-retrieval Beta-adrenergic Receptor Blockade: Effects On Extinction and Reconsolidation of Cocaine-cue Memories. Learn Mem. 2008;15(9):643-8. PubMed PMID: 18772251.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Post-retrieval beta-adrenergic receptor blockade: effects on extinction and reconsolidation of cocaine-cue memories. AU - Fricks-Gleason,Ashley N, AU - Marshall,John F, Y1 - 2008/08/26/ PY - 2008/9/6/pubmed PY - 2008/12/31/medline PY - 2008/9/6/entrez SP - 643 EP - 8 JF - Learning & memory (Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y.) JO - Learn Mem VL - 15 IS - 9 N2 - Contexts and discrete cues associated with drug-taking are often responsible for relapse among addicts. Animal models have shown that interference with the reconsolidation of drug-cue memories can reduce seeking of drugs or drug-paired stimuli. One such model is conditioned place preference (CPP) in which an animal is trained to associate a particular environment with the rewarding effects of a drug. Previous work from this laboratory has shown that intra-nucleus accumbens core infusions of a MEK inhibitor can interfere with reconsolidation of these drug-cue memories. A question that remains is whether post-retrieval drug effects on subsequent memories represent an interference with reconsolidation processes or rather a facilitation of extinction. In this experiment, we explore the effect of post-retrieval injections of propranolol, a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on reconsolidation and extinction of cocaine CPP. After acquisition of cocaine CPP, animals were given post-retrieval propranolol injections once or each day during a protocol of unreinforced preference tests, until the animals showed no preference for the previously cocaine-paired environment. Following a cocaine priming injection, the animals that received daily post-test propranolol injections did not reinstate their preference for the drug-paired side. In contrast, a single post-retrieval propranolol injection followed by multiple days of unreinforced preference tests failed to blunt subsequent cocaine reinstatement of the memory. These data suggest that daily post-retrieval systemic injections of propranolol decrease the conditioned preference by interfering with reconsolidation of the memory for the association between the drug-paired side and the reinforcing effects of the drug, rather than facilitating new extinction learning. SN - 1549-5485 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18772251/Post_retrieval_beta_adrenergic_receptor_blockade:_effects_on_extinction_and_reconsolidation_of_cocaine_cue_memories_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/18772251/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -