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Physician smoking status, attitudes toward smoking, and cessation advice to patients: an international survey.
Patient Educ Couns. 2009 Jan; 74(1):118-23.PE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The smoking status of physicians can impact interactions with patients about smoking. The 'Smoking: The Opinions of Physicians' (STOP) survey examined whether an association existed between physician smoking status and beliefs about smoking and cessation and a physician's clinical interactions with patients relevant to smoking cessation, and perceptions of barriers to assisting with quitting.

METHODS

General and family practitioners across 16 countries were surveyed via telephone or face-to-face interviews using a convenience-sample methodology. Physician smoking status was self-reported.

RESULTS

Of 4473 physicians invited, 2836 (63%) participated in the survey, 1200 (42%) of whom were smokers. Significantly fewer smoking than non-smoking physicians volunteered that smoking was a harmful activity (64% vs 77%; P<0.001). More non-smokers agreed that smoking cessation was the single biggest step to improving health (88% vs 82%; P<0.001) and discussed smoking at every visit (45% vs 34%; P<0.001). Although more non-smoking physicians identified willpower (37% vs 32%; P<0.001) and lack of interest (28% vs 22%; P<0.001) as barriers to quitting, more smoking physicians saw stress as a barrier (16% vs 10%; P<0.001).

CONCLUSION

Smoking physicians are less likely to initiate cessation interventions.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS

There is a need for specific strategies to encourage smoking physicians to quit, and to motivate all practitioners to adopt systematic approaches to assisting with smoking cessation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Minto Prevention and Rehabilitation Centre, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. apipe@ottawaheart.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18774670

Citation

Pipe, Andrew, et al. "Physician Smoking Status, Attitudes Toward Smoking, and Cessation Advice to Patients: an International Survey." Patient Education and Counseling, vol. 74, no. 1, 2009, pp. 118-23.
Pipe A, Sorensen M, Reid R. Physician smoking status, attitudes toward smoking, and cessation advice to patients: an international survey. Patient Educ Couns. 2009;74(1):118-23.
Pipe, A., Sorensen, M., & Reid, R. (2009). Physician smoking status, attitudes toward smoking, and cessation advice to patients: an international survey. Patient Education and Counseling, 74(1), 118-23. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2008.07.042
Pipe A, Sorensen M, Reid R. Physician Smoking Status, Attitudes Toward Smoking, and Cessation Advice to Patients: an International Survey. Patient Educ Couns. 2009;74(1):118-23. PubMed PMID: 18774670.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physician smoking status, attitudes toward smoking, and cessation advice to patients: an international survey. AU - Pipe,Andrew, AU - Sorensen,Michelle, AU - Reid,Robert, Y1 - 2008/09/06/ PY - 2007/12/05/received PY - 2008/06/11/revised PY - 2008/07/21/accepted PY - 2008/9/9/pubmed PY - 2009/4/4/medline PY - 2008/9/9/entrez SP - 118 EP - 23 JF - Patient education and counseling JO - Patient Educ Couns VL - 74 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The smoking status of physicians can impact interactions with patients about smoking. The 'Smoking: The Opinions of Physicians' (STOP) survey examined whether an association existed between physician smoking status and beliefs about smoking and cessation and a physician's clinical interactions with patients relevant to smoking cessation, and perceptions of barriers to assisting with quitting. METHODS: General and family practitioners across 16 countries were surveyed via telephone or face-to-face interviews using a convenience-sample methodology. Physician smoking status was self-reported. RESULTS: Of 4473 physicians invited, 2836 (63%) participated in the survey, 1200 (42%) of whom were smokers. Significantly fewer smoking than non-smoking physicians volunteered that smoking was a harmful activity (64% vs 77%; P<0.001). More non-smokers agreed that smoking cessation was the single biggest step to improving health (88% vs 82%; P<0.001) and discussed smoking at every visit (45% vs 34%; P<0.001). Although more non-smoking physicians identified willpower (37% vs 32%; P<0.001) and lack of interest (28% vs 22%; P<0.001) as barriers to quitting, more smoking physicians saw stress as a barrier (16% vs 10%; P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Smoking physicians are less likely to initiate cessation interventions. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: There is a need for specific strategies to encourage smoking physicians to quit, and to motivate all practitioners to adopt systematic approaches to assisting with smoking cessation. SN - 0738-3991 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18774670/Physician_smoking_status_attitudes_toward_smoking_and_cessation_advice_to_patients:_an_international_survey_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738-3991(08)00393-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -