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Factors influencing organizational participation in the Clinical Nurse Leader project.
Nurs Econ. 2008 Jul-Aug; 26(4):236-41, 249; quiz 242.NE

Abstract

When the American Association of Colleges of Nursing introduced the Clinical Nurse Leader"s (CNL) pilot project in 2004, it was the first time in more than 40 years that an attempt was made to introduce a new role to the profession. This new role was designed to address many challenges related to patient care in the current health care delivery system including a need for more effective clinical problem solving, better coordination at the point of care, stronger interdisciplinary relationships, and more rapid implementation of evidenced-based practice findings at the patient-provider interface. Critics from both academic and practice settings have questioned the need and wisdom of introducing a new role to the profession at this time. The factors that led some nursing leaders in early stages of this project to be proactive and involve their organizations as early adopters of the CNL role were examined in this study. Five major factors were identified from the research to form a framework designed to explain organizational participation: organizational needs, a desire to improve patient care, an opportunity to redesign care delivery, the promotion of the professional development of nursing staff, and the potential to enhance physician-nurse relationships. The ability of academic and service partners to forge the types of relationships and promote best practices as is occurring in the CNL project may be a critical success factor in confronting the current and impending nursing shortage.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nursing Leadership Institute, Christine E. Lynn College of Nursing, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18777972

Citation

Sherman, Rose O.. "Factors Influencing Organizational Participation in the Clinical Nurse Leader Project." Nursing Economic$, vol. 26, no. 4, 2008, pp. 236-41, 249; quiz 242.
Sherman RO. Factors influencing organizational participation in the Clinical Nurse Leader project. Nurs Econ. 2008;26(4):236-41, 249; quiz 242.
Sherman, R. O. (2008). Factors influencing organizational participation in the Clinical Nurse Leader project. Nursing Economic$, 26(4), 236-41, 249; quiz 242.
Sherman RO. Factors Influencing Organizational Participation in the Clinical Nurse Leader Project. Nurs Econ. 2008 Jul-Aug;26(4):236-41, 249; quiz 242. PubMed PMID: 18777972.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors influencing organizational participation in the Clinical Nurse Leader project. A1 - Sherman,Rose O, PY - 2008/9/10/pubmed PY - 2008/11/11/medline PY - 2008/9/10/entrez SP - 236-41, 249; quiz 242 JF - Nursing economic$ JO - Nurs Econ VL - 26 IS - 4 N2 - When the American Association of Colleges of Nursing introduced the Clinical Nurse Leader"s (CNL) pilot project in 2004, it was the first time in more than 40 years that an attempt was made to introduce a new role to the profession. This new role was designed to address many challenges related to patient care in the current health care delivery system including a need for more effective clinical problem solving, better coordination at the point of care, stronger interdisciplinary relationships, and more rapid implementation of evidenced-based practice findings at the patient-provider interface. Critics from both academic and practice settings have questioned the need and wisdom of introducing a new role to the profession at this time. The factors that led some nursing leaders in early stages of this project to be proactive and involve their organizations as early adopters of the CNL role were examined in this study. Five major factors were identified from the research to form a framework designed to explain organizational participation: organizational needs, a desire to improve patient care, an opportunity to redesign care delivery, the promotion of the professional development of nursing staff, and the potential to enhance physician-nurse relationships. The ability of academic and service partners to forge the types of relationships and promote best practices as is occurring in the CNL project may be a critical success factor in confronting the current and impending nursing shortage. SN - 0746-1739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18777972/Factors_influencing_organizational_participation_in_the_Clinical_Nurse_Leader_project_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=18777972.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -