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Vitamin B12 status and rate of brain volume loss in community-dwelling elderly.
Neurology 2008; 71(11):826-32Neur

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the relationship between markers of vitamin B(12) status and brain volume loss per year over a 5-year period in an elderly population.

METHODS

A prospective study of 107 community-dwelling volunteers aged 61 to 87 years without cognitive impairment at enrollment. Volunteers were assessed yearly by clinical examination, MRI scans, and cognitive tests. Blood was collected at baseline for measurement of plasma vitamin B(12), transcobalamin (TC), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), total homocysteine (tHcy), and serum folate.

RESULTS

The decrease in brain volume was greater among those with lower vitamin B(12) and holoTC levels and higher plasma tHcy and MMA levels at baseline. Linear regression analysis showed that associations with vitamin B(12) and holoTC remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, creatinine, education, initial brain volume, cognitive test scores, systolic blood pressure, ApoE epsilon4 status, tHcy, and folate. Using the upper (for the vitamins) or lower tertile (for the metabolites) as reference in logistic regression analysis and adjusting for the above covariates, vitamin B(12) in the bottom tertile (<308 pmol/L) was associated with increased rate of brain volume loss (odds ratio 6.17, 95% CI 1.25-30.47). The association was similar for low levels of holoTC (<54 pmol/L) (odds ratio 5.99, 95% CI 1.21-29.81) and for low TC saturation. High levels of MMA or tHcy or low levels of folate were not associated with brain volume loss.

CONCLUSION

Low vitamin B(12) status should be further investigated as a modifiable cause of brain atrophy and of likely subsequent cognitive impairment in the elderly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Le Gros Clark Building, South Parks Rd., Oxford OX1 3QX, UK. anna.vogiatzoglou@dpag.ox.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18779510

Citation

Vogiatzoglou, A, et al. "Vitamin B12 Status and Rate of Brain Volume Loss in Community-dwelling Elderly." Neurology, vol. 71, no. 11, 2008, pp. 826-32.
Vogiatzoglou A, Refsum H, Johnston C, et al. Vitamin B12 status and rate of brain volume loss in community-dwelling elderly. Neurology. 2008;71(11):826-32.
Vogiatzoglou, A., Refsum, H., Johnston, C., Smith, S. M., Bradley, K. M., de Jager, C., ... Smith, A. D. (2008). Vitamin B12 status and rate of brain volume loss in community-dwelling elderly. Neurology, 71(11), pp. 826-32. doi:10.1212/01.wnl.0000325581.26991.f2.
Vogiatzoglou A, et al. Vitamin B12 Status and Rate of Brain Volume Loss in Community-dwelling Elderly. Neurology. 2008 Sep 9;71(11):826-32. PubMed PMID: 18779510.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin B12 status and rate of brain volume loss in community-dwelling elderly. AU - Vogiatzoglou,A, AU - Refsum,H, AU - Johnston,C, AU - Smith,S M, AU - Bradley,K M, AU - de Jager,C, AU - Budge,M M, AU - Smith,A D, PY - 2008/9/10/pubmed PY - 2008/10/4/medline PY - 2008/9/10/entrez SP - 826 EP - 32 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 71 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relationship between markers of vitamin B(12) status and brain volume loss per year over a 5-year period in an elderly population. METHODS: A prospective study of 107 community-dwelling volunteers aged 61 to 87 years without cognitive impairment at enrollment. Volunteers were assessed yearly by clinical examination, MRI scans, and cognitive tests. Blood was collected at baseline for measurement of plasma vitamin B(12), transcobalamin (TC), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), total homocysteine (tHcy), and serum folate. RESULTS: The decrease in brain volume was greater among those with lower vitamin B(12) and holoTC levels and higher plasma tHcy and MMA levels at baseline. Linear regression analysis showed that associations with vitamin B(12) and holoTC remained significant after adjustment for age, sex, creatinine, education, initial brain volume, cognitive test scores, systolic blood pressure, ApoE epsilon4 status, tHcy, and folate. Using the upper (for the vitamins) or lower tertile (for the metabolites) as reference in logistic regression analysis and adjusting for the above covariates, vitamin B(12) in the bottom tertile (<308 pmol/L) was associated with increased rate of brain volume loss (odds ratio 6.17, 95% CI 1.25-30.47). The association was similar for low levels of holoTC (<54 pmol/L) (odds ratio 5.99, 95% CI 1.21-29.81) and for low TC saturation. High levels of MMA or tHcy or low levels of folate were not associated with brain volume loss. CONCLUSION: Low vitamin B(12) status should be further investigated as a modifiable cause of brain atrophy and of likely subsequent cognitive impairment in the elderly. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18779510/Vitamin_B12_status_and_rate_of_brain_volume_loss_in_community_dwelling_elderly_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18779510 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -