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Aripiprazole effects on alcohol consumption and subjective reports in a clinical laboratory paradigm--possible influence of self-control.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008 Nov; 32(11):1954-61.AC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

There has been increasing interest in the use of medications that affect the dopamine receptor in the treatment of alcoholism. Aripiprazole has the unique pharmacology of being a partial dopamine agonist serving to stabilize brain dopamine systems in both frontal cortical and subcortical areas. As such, it might act to dampen alcohol reinforcement and craving and/or alter control over alcohol use. The current clinical laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of aripiprazole as a potential agent to alter drinking and objective effects of alcohol.

METHODS

Thirty nontreatment seeking alcoholics were enrolled in a subacute human laboratory study and received double-blind treatment with up to 15 mg of aripiprazole (n = 15) or identical placebo (n = 15) for 8 days. Tolerability and utility of aripiprazole was monitored during natural drinking over the first 6 days of medication treatment and also during a free choice limited access alcohol consumption paradigm following an initial drink of alcohol in a bar-lab setting on Day 8.

RESULTS

Aripiprazole was well tolerated and reduced drinking in nontreatment seeking alcoholics over 6 days of natural drinking--especially in those with lower self control (more impulsive). It also reduced drinks in the bar-lab after a priming drink and broke the link between priming drink induced stimulation and further drinking. During the bar-lab drinking session, there were no differences in subjective high, intoxication, or craving between subjects treated with aripiprazole or placebo.

DISCUSSION

This study joins several others in demonstrating the utility of subacute dosing laboratory paradigms for evaluating medication effects in alcoholics. Aripiprazole was well tolerated and lowered alcohol use, especially in those with lower impulse control. Further study is needed to determine the safety and utility of aripiprazole in the treatment of alcoholism and if subgroups of alcoholics are more likely to respond.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Alcohol Research Center, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina 29425, USA. voronin@musc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18782344

Citation

Voronin, Konstantin, et al. "Aripiprazole Effects On Alcohol Consumption and Subjective Reports in a Clinical Laboratory Paradigm--possible Influence of Self-control." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 32, no. 11, 2008, pp. 1954-61.
Voronin K, Randall P, Myrick H, et al. Aripiprazole effects on alcohol consumption and subjective reports in a clinical laboratory paradigm--possible influence of self-control. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008;32(11):1954-61.
Voronin, K., Randall, P., Myrick, H., & Anton, R. (2008). Aripiprazole effects on alcohol consumption and subjective reports in a clinical laboratory paradigm--possible influence of self-control. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 32(11), 1954-61. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2008.00783.x
Voronin K, et al. Aripiprazole Effects On Alcohol Consumption and Subjective Reports in a Clinical Laboratory Paradigm--possible Influence of Self-control. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2008;32(11):1954-61. PubMed PMID: 18782344.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aripiprazole effects on alcohol consumption and subjective reports in a clinical laboratory paradigm--possible influence of self-control. AU - Voronin,Konstantin, AU - Randall,Patrick, AU - Myrick,Hugh, AU - Anton,Raymond, Y1 - 2008/09/08/ PY - 2008/9/11/pubmed PY - 2009/2/10/medline PY - 2008/9/11/entrez SP - 1954 EP - 61 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 32 IS - 11 N2 - INTRODUCTION: There has been increasing interest in the use of medications that affect the dopamine receptor in the treatment of alcoholism. Aripiprazole has the unique pharmacology of being a partial dopamine agonist serving to stabilize brain dopamine systems in both frontal cortical and subcortical areas. As such, it might act to dampen alcohol reinforcement and craving and/or alter control over alcohol use. The current clinical laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the safety and efficacy of aripiprazole as a potential agent to alter drinking and objective effects of alcohol. METHODS: Thirty nontreatment seeking alcoholics were enrolled in a subacute human laboratory study and received double-blind treatment with up to 15 mg of aripiprazole (n = 15) or identical placebo (n = 15) for 8 days. Tolerability and utility of aripiprazole was monitored during natural drinking over the first 6 days of medication treatment and also during a free choice limited access alcohol consumption paradigm following an initial drink of alcohol in a bar-lab setting on Day 8. RESULTS: Aripiprazole was well tolerated and reduced drinking in nontreatment seeking alcoholics over 6 days of natural drinking--especially in those with lower self control (more impulsive). It also reduced drinks in the bar-lab after a priming drink and broke the link between priming drink induced stimulation and further drinking. During the bar-lab drinking session, there were no differences in subjective high, intoxication, or craving between subjects treated with aripiprazole or placebo. DISCUSSION: This study joins several others in demonstrating the utility of subacute dosing laboratory paradigms for evaluating medication effects in alcoholics. Aripiprazole was well tolerated and lowered alcohol use, especially in those with lower impulse control. Further study is needed to determine the safety and utility of aripiprazole in the treatment of alcoholism and if subgroups of alcoholics are more likely to respond. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18782344/Aripiprazole_effects_on_alcohol_consumption_and_subjective_reports_in_a_clinical_laboratory_paradigm__possible_influence_of_self_control_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1530-0277.2008.00783.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -