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Late primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome.
Am J Transplant 2008; 8(11):2454-62AJ

Abstract

Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a common early complication after lung transplantation. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 334 recipients to evaluate the impact of PGD graded at 24, 48 and 72 h on the risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) development (stage 1) and progression (stages 2 and 3). We constructed multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to determine the risk of BOS attributable to PGD in the context of other potential risk factors including acute rejection, lymphocytic bronchitis and respiratory viral infections. All grades of PGD at all time points were significant risk factors for BOS development and progression independent of acute rejection, lymphocytic bronchitis and respiratory viral infections. Specifically, PGD grade 1 at T24 was associated with a relative risk of BOS stage 1 of 1.93, grade 2 with a relative risk of 2.29 and grade 3 with a relative risk of 3.31. Furthermore, this direct relationship between the severity of PGD and the risk of BOS persisted at all time points. We conclude that all grades of PGD at all time points are independent risk factors for BOS development and progression. Future strategies that might attenuate the severity of PGD may mitigate the risk of BOS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18785961

Citation

Huang, H J., et al. "Late Primary Graft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation and Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome." American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, vol. 8, no. 11, 2008, pp. 2454-62.
Huang HJ, Yusen RD, Meyers BF, et al. Late primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Am J Transplant. 2008;8(11):2454-62.
Huang, H. J., Yusen, R. D., Meyers, B. F., Walter, M. J., Mohanakumar, T., Patterson, G. A., ... Hachem, R. R. (2008). Late primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 8(11), pp. 2454-62. doi:10.1111/j.1600-6143.2008.02389.x.
Huang HJ, et al. Late Primary Graft Dysfunction After Lung Transplantation and Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome. Am J Transplant. 2008;8(11):2454-62. PubMed PMID: 18785961.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Late primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. AU - Huang,H J, AU - Yusen,R D, AU - Meyers,B F, AU - Walter,M J, AU - Mohanakumar,T, AU - Patterson,G A, AU - Trulock,E P, AU - Hachem,R R, Y1 - 2008/09/10/ PY - 2008/9/13/pubmed PY - 2009/3/27/medline PY - 2008/9/13/entrez SP - 2454 EP - 62 JF - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons JO - Am. J. Transplant. VL - 8 IS - 11 N2 - Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a common early complication after lung transplantation. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 334 recipients to evaluate the impact of PGD graded at 24, 48 and 72 h on the risk of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) development (stage 1) and progression (stages 2 and 3). We constructed multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to determine the risk of BOS attributable to PGD in the context of other potential risk factors including acute rejection, lymphocytic bronchitis and respiratory viral infections. All grades of PGD at all time points were significant risk factors for BOS development and progression independent of acute rejection, lymphocytic bronchitis and respiratory viral infections. Specifically, PGD grade 1 at T24 was associated with a relative risk of BOS stage 1 of 1.93, grade 2 with a relative risk of 2.29 and grade 3 with a relative risk of 3.31. Furthermore, this direct relationship between the severity of PGD and the risk of BOS persisted at all time points. We conclude that all grades of PGD at all time points are independent risk factors for BOS development and progression. Future strategies that might attenuate the severity of PGD may mitigate the risk of BOS. SN - 1600-6143 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18785961/Late_primary_graft_dysfunction_after_lung_transplantation_and_bronchiolitis_obliterans_syndrome_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2008.02389.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -