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Family and racial factors associated with suicide and emotional distress among latino students.
J Sch Health. 2008 Sep; 78(9):487-95.JS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Latino youth experience disproportionate rates of mental health problems including suicide and depression. Better understanding of underlying risk and protective factors on the part of school-based health professionals, teachers, and health care providers in their lives is warranted. The aims of this secondary analysis of 2004 Minnesota Student Survey data were to (1) describe the mental health status of a statewide sample of Latino 9th- and 12th-grade students; (2) explore relationships of family protective factors (communication, caring, and connection) with suicidal ideation, suicidal attempts, and emotional distress; and (3) highlight similarities and differences in family protective factors among subgroups of Latino students.

METHODS

Parallel analyses were completed for Latino-only and Latino-mixed students. Bivariate logistic regression models were used to examine associations between each family variable and each study outcome.

RESULTS

Nearly 1 in 5 Latino high school students have had suicidal thoughts in the past year; past year suicide attempts ranged from 6% to 18.5% across grade and gender subgroups. Most concerning are ninth-grade Latino girls, a group in which 30-40% reported suicidal thoughts and 14-19% reported attempting suicide in the past year.

CONCLUSIONS

An important study finding is the high rate of suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and emotional distress among students who self-identified as being of mixed ethnicity. Study findings can be used to inform mental health promotion initiatives and culturally tailor interventions with Latino students.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA. garcia@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18786041

Citation

Garcia, Carolyn, et al. "Family and Racial Factors Associated With Suicide and Emotional Distress Among Latino Students." The Journal of School Health, vol. 78, no. 9, 2008, pp. 487-95.
Garcia C, Skay C, Sieving R, et al. Family and racial factors associated with suicide and emotional distress among latino students. J Sch Health. 2008;78(9):487-95.
Garcia, C., Skay, C., Sieving, R., Naughton, S., & Bearinger, L. H. (2008). Family and racial factors associated with suicide and emotional distress among latino students. The Journal of School Health, 78(9), 487-95. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2008.00334.x
Garcia C, et al. Family and Racial Factors Associated With Suicide and Emotional Distress Among Latino Students. J Sch Health. 2008;78(9):487-95. PubMed PMID: 18786041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Family and racial factors associated with suicide and emotional distress among latino students. AU - Garcia,Carolyn, AU - Skay,Carol, AU - Sieving,Renee, AU - Naughton,Sandy, AU - Bearinger,Linda H, PY - 2008/9/13/pubmed PY - 2008/11/19/medline PY - 2008/9/13/entrez SP - 487 EP - 95 JF - The Journal of school health JO - J Sch Health VL - 78 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Latino youth experience disproportionate rates of mental health problems including suicide and depression. Better understanding of underlying risk and protective factors on the part of school-based health professionals, teachers, and health care providers in their lives is warranted. The aims of this secondary analysis of 2004 Minnesota Student Survey data were to (1) describe the mental health status of a statewide sample of Latino 9th- and 12th-grade students; (2) explore relationships of family protective factors (communication, caring, and connection) with suicidal ideation, suicidal attempts, and emotional distress; and (3) highlight similarities and differences in family protective factors among subgroups of Latino students. METHODS: Parallel analyses were completed for Latino-only and Latino-mixed students. Bivariate logistic regression models were used to examine associations between each family variable and each study outcome. RESULTS: Nearly 1 in 5 Latino high school students have had suicidal thoughts in the past year; past year suicide attempts ranged from 6% to 18.5% across grade and gender subgroups. Most concerning are ninth-grade Latino girls, a group in which 30-40% reported suicidal thoughts and 14-19% reported attempting suicide in the past year. CONCLUSIONS: An important study finding is the high rate of suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, and emotional distress among students who self-identified as being of mixed ethnicity. Study findings can be used to inform mental health promotion initiatives and culturally tailor interventions with Latino students. SN - 1746-1561 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18786041/Family_and_racial_factors_associated_with_suicide_and_emotional_distress_among_latino_students_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1746-1561.2008.00334.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -