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Adherence to Mediterranean diet and health status: meta-analysis.
BMJ. 2008 Sep 11; 337:a1344.BMJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To systematically review all the prospective cohort studies that have analysed the relation between adherence to a Mediterranean diet, mortality, and incidence of chronic diseases in a primary prevention setting.

DESIGN

Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

DATA SOURCES

English and non-English publications in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1966 to 30 June 2008. Studies reviewed Studies that analysed prospectively the association between adherence to a Mediterranean diet, mortality, and incidence of diseases; 12 studies, with a total of 1 574,299 subjects followed for a time ranging from three to 18 years were included.

RESULTS

The cumulative analysis among eight cohorts (514,816 subjects and 33,576 deaths) evaluating overall mortality in relation to adherence to a Mediterranean diet showed that a two point increase in the adherence score was significantly associated with a reduced risk of mortality (pooled relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 0.94). Likewise, the analyses showed a beneficial role for greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet on cardiovascular mortality (pooled relative risk 0.91, 0.87 to 0.95), incidence of or mortality from cancer (0.94, 0.92 to 0.96), and incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (0.87, 0.80 to 0.96).

CONCLUSIONS

Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a significant improvement in health status, as seen by a significant reduction in overall mortality (9%), mortality from cardiovascular diseases (9%), incidence of or mortality from cancer (6%), and incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (13%). These results seem to be clinically relevant for public health, in particular for encouraging a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern for primary prevention of major chronic diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical and Surgical Critical Care, Thrombosis Centre, University of Florence, Viale Morgagni 85, 50134 Florence, Italy. francescosofi@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18786971

Citation

Sofi, Francesco, et al. "Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Health Status: Meta-analysis." BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), vol. 337, 2008, pp. a1344.
Sofi F, Cesari F, Abbate R, et al. Adherence to Mediterranean diet and health status: meta-analysis. BMJ. 2008;337:a1344.
Sofi, F., Cesari, F., Abbate, R., Gensini, G. F., & Casini, A. (2008). Adherence to Mediterranean diet and health status: meta-analysis. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.), 337, a1344. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.a1344
Sofi F, et al. Adherence to Mediterranean Diet and Health Status: Meta-analysis. BMJ. 2008 Sep 11;337:a1344. PubMed PMID: 18786971.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adherence to Mediterranean diet and health status: meta-analysis. AU - Sofi,Francesco, AU - Cesari,Francesca, AU - Abbate,Rosanna, AU - Gensini,Gian Franco, AU - Casini,Alessandro, Y1 - 2008/09/11/ PY - 2008/9/13/pubmed PY - 2008/9/27/medline PY - 2008/9/13/entrez SP - a1344 EP - a1344 JF - BMJ (Clinical research ed.) JO - BMJ VL - 337 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To systematically review all the prospective cohort studies that have analysed the relation between adherence to a Mediterranean diet, mortality, and incidence of chronic diseases in a primary prevention setting. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. DATA SOURCES: English and non-English publications in PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials from 1966 to 30 June 2008. Studies reviewed Studies that analysed prospectively the association between adherence to a Mediterranean diet, mortality, and incidence of diseases; 12 studies, with a total of 1 574,299 subjects followed for a time ranging from three to 18 years were included. RESULTS: The cumulative analysis among eight cohorts (514,816 subjects and 33,576 deaths) evaluating overall mortality in relation to adherence to a Mediterranean diet showed that a two point increase in the adherence score was significantly associated with a reduced risk of mortality (pooled relative risk 0.91, 95% confidence interval 0.89 to 0.94). Likewise, the analyses showed a beneficial role for greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet on cardiovascular mortality (pooled relative risk 0.91, 0.87 to 0.95), incidence of or mortality from cancer (0.94, 0.92 to 0.96), and incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (0.87, 0.80 to 0.96). CONCLUSIONS: Greater adherence to a Mediterranean diet is associated with a significant improvement in health status, as seen by a significant reduction in overall mortality (9%), mortality from cardiovascular diseases (9%), incidence of or mortality from cancer (6%), and incidence of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (13%). These results seem to be clinically relevant for public health, in particular for encouraging a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern for primary prevention of major chronic diseases. SN - 1756-1833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18786971/Adherence_to_Mediterranean_diet_and_health_status:_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://www.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18786971 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -