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Course, complications, and outcome of juvenile arthritis-related uveitis.
J AAPOS. 2008 Dec; 12(6):539-45.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To describe the clinical features of uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA).

METHODS

Retrospective chart review of a subset of 1,081 consecutive JIA patients who were younger than 18 years of age and had uveitis, with a minimum of 1-year follow-up at a single center.

RESULTS

One hundred forty-two patients (13.1%) developed uveitis after a mean follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 0.10-23.2). Uveitis types were chronic anterior (97/142, 68.3%), acute anterior (23/142, 16.2%), recurrent anterior (17/142, 12%), and panuveitis (5/142, 3.5%). Uveitic complications were observed in 37.3% of cases (53/142) and 32.5% of eyes (74/228). When we compared uveitic eyes with complications to uveitic eyes without complications, we found the following significant differences: time interval from diagnosis of JIA to diagnosis of uveitis was shorter (mean, 1.3 years vs. 2.2 years; p = 0.003) and use of oral prednisone was greater (59.1% vs 15.6%; p < 0.0001) in the eyes with complications. Twenty-one children (21/142, 14.8%) with uveitis underwent a total of 62 ocular surgeries. Good visual acuity (20/40 or better) was found in 90.8% of eyes (159/175) and in both eyes of 87% of cases (94/108), impaired visual acuity in 6 eyes of 4 cases (6/175, 3.4%), and blindness in 10 eyes of 10 cases (10/175, 5.7%). Only 2 patients had reduced visual acuity in both eyes. Surgery was the single most important risk factor for reduced visual acuity at the last follow-up (p = 0.0086).

CONCLUSIONS

Most uveitic eyes with JIA achieved good visual outcome despite uveitic complications.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Science, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comment
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18789737

Citation

Sabri, Kourosh, et al. "Course, Complications, and Outcome of Juvenile Arthritis-related Uveitis." Journal of AAPOS : the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, vol. 12, no. 6, 2008, pp. 539-45.
Sabri K, Saurenmann RK, Silverman ED, et al. Course, complications, and outcome of juvenile arthritis-related uveitis. J AAPOS. 2008;12(6):539-45.
Sabri, K., Saurenmann, R. K., Silverman, E. D., & Levin, A. V. (2008). Course, complications, and outcome of juvenile arthritis-related uveitis. Journal of AAPOS : the Official Publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, 12(6), 539-45. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaapos.2008.03.007
Sabri K, et al. Course, Complications, and Outcome of Juvenile Arthritis-related Uveitis. J AAPOS. 2008;12(6):539-45. PubMed PMID: 18789737.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Course, complications, and outcome of juvenile arthritis-related uveitis. AU - Sabri,Kourosh, AU - Saurenmann,Rotraud K, AU - Silverman,Earl D, AU - Levin,Alex V, Y1 - 2008/09/12/ PY - 2007/08/10/received PY - 2008/03/17/revised PY - 2008/03/17/accepted PY - 2008/9/16/pubmed PY - 2009/4/7/medline PY - 2008/9/16/entrez SP - 539 EP - 45 JF - Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus JO - J AAPOS VL - 12 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To describe the clinical features of uveitis in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: Retrospective chart review of a subset of 1,081 consecutive JIA patients who were younger than 18 years of age and had uveitis, with a minimum of 1-year follow-up at a single center. RESULTS: One hundred forty-two patients (13.1%) developed uveitis after a mean follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 0.10-23.2). Uveitis types were chronic anterior (97/142, 68.3%), acute anterior (23/142, 16.2%), recurrent anterior (17/142, 12%), and panuveitis (5/142, 3.5%). Uveitic complications were observed in 37.3% of cases (53/142) and 32.5% of eyes (74/228). When we compared uveitic eyes with complications to uveitic eyes without complications, we found the following significant differences: time interval from diagnosis of JIA to diagnosis of uveitis was shorter (mean, 1.3 years vs. 2.2 years; p = 0.003) and use of oral prednisone was greater (59.1% vs 15.6%; p < 0.0001) in the eyes with complications. Twenty-one children (21/142, 14.8%) with uveitis underwent a total of 62 ocular surgeries. Good visual acuity (20/40 or better) was found in 90.8% of eyes (159/175) and in both eyes of 87% of cases (94/108), impaired visual acuity in 6 eyes of 4 cases (6/175, 3.4%), and blindness in 10 eyes of 10 cases (10/175, 5.7%). Only 2 patients had reduced visual acuity in both eyes. Surgery was the single most important risk factor for reduced visual acuity at the last follow-up (p = 0.0086). CONCLUSIONS: Most uveitic eyes with JIA achieved good visual outcome despite uveitic complications. SN - 1528-3933 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18789737/Course_complications_and_outcome_of_juvenile_arthritis_related_uveitis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1091-8531(08)00116-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -