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Violations of behavioral practices revealed in closed claims reviews.
Ann Surg. 2008 Sep; 248(3):468-74.AnnS

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Closed claims against general surgeons were reviewed, seeking insights into the effects of surgeons' deficient behavioral practices on outcomes. Research and educational strategies based on findings may reduce errors and improve care.

SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA

Adverse events occur in 2.9% to 3.7% of hospital admissions in the United States. Of these adverse events, 27.4% to 32.6% are the result of errors. Failures at the point-of-service can undermine the other elements of systems of care designed to reduce preventable adverse outcomes. In this regard, the relative importance of surgeons' behavior is poorly defined.

METHODS

Fellows of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) reviewed 460 malpractice claims against general surgeons. The relationship between detrimental behavioral practice patterns--deficiencies in care that reflected a lack of diligence, vigilance, and/or commitment of time more than a lack of knowledge and/or skill--and the preventability of adverse events was assessed.

RESULTS

Failures in practice patterns of behavior occurred in 78% of cases and were frequently associated with preventable injuries. When both behavioral practice violations and technical misadventures occurred, the complications were more likely to be preventable than if only a technical misadventure had occurred. Among several deficient behavioral practices, the failure to communicate was most pervasive, accounting for 22% of complications in the study.

CONCLUSIONS

Stakeholders in health care policy should focus on the issue of physician behavior in crafting shifts in institutional cultures and in targeting new CME toward evidenced-based behavioral practices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, Louisiana State University,1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130, USA. fgriff@lsuhsc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18791367

Citation

Griffen, F Dean, et al. "Violations of Behavioral Practices Revealed in Closed Claims Reviews." Annals of Surgery, vol. 248, no. 3, 2008, pp. 468-74.
Griffen FD, Stephens LS, Alexander JB, et al. Violations of behavioral practices revealed in closed claims reviews. Ann Surg. 2008;248(3):468-74.
Griffen, F. D., Stephens, L. S., Alexander, J. B., Bailey, H. R., Maizel, S. E., Sutton, B. H., & Posner, K. L. (2008). Violations of behavioral practices revealed in closed claims reviews. Annals of Surgery, 248(3), 468-74. https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0b013e318185e196
Griffen FD, et al. Violations of Behavioral Practices Revealed in Closed Claims Reviews. Ann Surg. 2008;248(3):468-74. PubMed PMID: 18791367.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Violations of behavioral practices revealed in closed claims reviews. AU - Griffen,F Dean, AU - Stephens,Linda S, AU - Alexander,James B, AU - Bailey,H Randolph, AU - Maizel,Scott E, AU - Sutton,Beth H, AU - Posner,Karen L, PY - 2008/9/16/pubmed PY - 2008/9/27/medline PY - 2008/9/16/entrez SP - 468 EP - 74 JF - Annals of surgery JO - Ann Surg VL - 248 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Closed claims against general surgeons were reviewed, seeking insights into the effects of surgeons' deficient behavioral practices on outcomes. Research and educational strategies based on findings may reduce errors and improve care. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Adverse events occur in 2.9% to 3.7% of hospital admissions in the United States. Of these adverse events, 27.4% to 32.6% are the result of errors. Failures at the point-of-service can undermine the other elements of systems of care designed to reduce preventable adverse outcomes. In this regard, the relative importance of surgeons' behavior is poorly defined. METHODS: Fellows of the American College of Surgeons (ACS) reviewed 460 malpractice claims against general surgeons. The relationship between detrimental behavioral practice patterns--deficiencies in care that reflected a lack of diligence, vigilance, and/or commitment of time more than a lack of knowledge and/or skill--and the preventability of adverse events was assessed. RESULTS: Failures in practice patterns of behavior occurred in 78% of cases and were frequently associated with preventable injuries. When both behavioral practice violations and technical misadventures occurred, the complications were more likely to be preventable than if only a technical misadventure had occurred. Among several deficient behavioral practices, the failure to communicate was most pervasive, accounting for 22% of complications in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Stakeholders in health care policy should focus on the issue of physician behavior in crafting shifts in institutional cultures and in targeting new CME toward evidenced-based behavioral practices. SN - 1528-1140 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18791367/Violations_of_behavioral_practices_revealed_in_closed_claims_reviews_ L2 - https://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18791367 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -