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Trends in gender, employment, salary, and debt of graduates of US veterinary medical schools and colleges.
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Sep 15; 233(6):910-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize trends in gender, employment, starting salaries, and educational debt of graduates of US veterinary medical schools and colleges from 1988 to 2007.

DESIGN

Meta-analysis. Sample Population-Veterinary medical graduates from 26 or 27 of 27 US veterinary schools and colleges from 1988 through 2007.

PROCEDURES

Data were obtained from surveys published in the JAVMA. A chi2 test for trend was used to analyze trends in choices of employment and educational indebtedness for the veterinary graduate populations over time.

RESULTS

The greatest changes in employment occurred in predominantly large animal practice, which attracted 10.7% of new graduates in 1989 but only 2.2% in 2007, and in advanced study, which attracted 15.2% of new graduates in 1989 and 36.8% in 2007. In 2007, 75% of graduates were women, but this gender shift was not associated with the decline in the percentage of graduates entering rural practice. From 1989 through 2007, starting salaries in private practice increased at a rate of 4.60%/y. During the same period, educational debt increased at an annual rate of 7.36%, or 60% higher than the rate of increases for starting salaries. As a result, debt at graduation increased from 1.1 times the starting salary in 1989 to 2.0 times the starting salary in 2007.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Veterinary students are now more in debt than they have ever been. This trend together with a substantial increase in the rate of interest charged for government-backed education loans create conditions for new graduates that appear unsustainable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, New Bolton Center, Kennett Square, PA 19348, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18795850

Citation

Chieffo, Carla, et al. "Trends in Gender, Employment, Salary, and Debt of Graduates of US Veterinary Medical Schools and Colleges." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 233, no. 6, 2008, pp. 910-7.
Chieffo C, Kelly AM, Ferguson J. Trends in gender, employment, salary, and debt of graduates of US veterinary medical schools and colleges. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008;233(6):910-7.
Chieffo, C., Kelly, A. M., & Ferguson, J. (2008). Trends in gender, employment, salary, and debt of graduates of US veterinary medical schools and colleges. Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 233(6), 910-7. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.233.6.910
Chieffo C, Kelly AM, Ferguson J. Trends in Gender, Employment, Salary, and Debt of Graduates of US Veterinary Medical Schools and Colleges. J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Sep 15;233(6):910-7. PubMed PMID: 18795850.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in gender, employment, salary, and debt of graduates of US veterinary medical schools and colleges. AU - Chieffo,Carla, AU - Kelly,Alan M, AU - Ferguson,James, PY - 2008/9/18/pubmed PY - 2008/10/23/medline PY - 2008/9/18/entrez SP - 910 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 233 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To characterize trends in gender, employment, starting salaries, and educational debt of graduates of US veterinary medical schools and colleges from 1988 to 2007. DESIGN: Meta-analysis. Sample Population-Veterinary medical graduates from 26 or 27 of 27 US veterinary schools and colleges from 1988 through 2007. PROCEDURES: Data were obtained from surveys published in the JAVMA. A chi2 test for trend was used to analyze trends in choices of employment and educational indebtedness for the veterinary graduate populations over time. RESULTS: The greatest changes in employment occurred in predominantly large animal practice, which attracted 10.7% of new graduates in 1989 but only 2.2% in 2007, and in advanced study, which attracted 15.2% of new graduates in 1989 and 36.8% in 2007. In 2007, 75% of graduates were women, but this gender shift was not associated with the decline in the percentage of graduates entering rural practice. From 1989 through 2007, starting salaries in private practice increased at a rate of 4.60%/y. During the same period, educational debt increased at an annual rate of 7.36%, or 60% higher than the rate of increases for starting salaries. As a result, debt at graduation increased from 1.1 times the starting salary in 1989 to 2.0 times the starting salary in 2007. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Veterinary students are now more in debt than they have ever been. This trend together with a substantial increase in the rate of interest charged for government-backed education loans create conditions for new graduates that appear unsustainable. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18795850/Trends_in_gender_employment_salary_and_debt_of_graduates_of_US_veterinary_medical_schools_and_colleges_ L2 - https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.233.6.910?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -