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Clinical measures of physical fitness predict insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes.
Phys Ther. 2008 Nov; 88(11):1355-64.PT

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE

Physical inactivity has been well documented as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Previous studies measured the level of physical activity either with questionnaires or with direct measurements of maximum oxygen uptake. However, questionnaires are patient-report measures, and methods for obtaining direct maximum oxygen uptake measurements often are not available clinically. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether clinical measurement of health-related physical fitness with a simple test battery can predict insulin resistance, a precursor of type 2 diabetes, in people at risk for diabetes.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

A total of 151 volunteers with at least one diabetes risk factor (overweight, hypertension, dyslipidemia, family history, impaired glucose tolerance, gestational diabetes, or delivering a baby weighing more than 4.0 kg) were recruited. Insulin resistance (as determined with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), physical fitness (including body composition, as determined with the body mass index and waist circumference), muscle strength (handgrip strength [force-generating capacity]), muscle endurance (sit-up test), flexibility (sit-and-reach test), and cardiorespiratory endurance (step test) were measured, and a physical activity questionnaire was administered. Backward regression analysis was used to build the prediction models for insulin resistance from components of physical fitness and physical activity.

RESULTS

Body mass index, muscle strength, and cardiorespiratory fitness predicted HOMA-IR in men (adjusted R(2)=.264). In women, age, waist circumference, and cardiorespiratory fitness were the predictors of HOMA-IR (adjusted R(2)=.438).

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION

Clinical measures of physical fitness can predict insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes. The findings support the validity of clinical measures of physical fitness for predicting insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18801854

Citation

Chen, Chiao-Nan, et al. "Clinical Measures of Physical Fitness Predict Insulin Resistance in People at Risk for Diabetes." Physical Therapy, vol. 88, no. 11, 2008, pp. 1355-64.
Chen CN, Chuang LM, Wu YT. Clinical measures of physical fitness predict insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes. Phys Ther. 2008;88(11):1355-64.
Chen, C. N., Chuang, L. M., & Wu, Y. T. (2008). Clinical measures of physical fitness predict insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes. Physical Therapy, 88(11), 1355-64. https://doi.org/10.2522/ptj.20080064
Chen CN, Chuang LM, Wu YT. Clinical Measures of Physical Fitness Predict Insulin Resistance in People at Risk for Diabetes. Phys Ther. 2008;88(11):1355-64. PubMed PMID: 18801854.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical measures of physical fitness predict insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes. AU - Chen,Chiao-Nan, AU - Chuang,Lee-Ming, AU - Wu,Ying-Tai, Y1 - 2008/09/18/ PY - 2008/9/20/pubmed PY - 2009/1/23/medline PY - 2008/9/20/entrez SP - 1355 EP - 64 JF - Physical therapy JO - Phys Ther VL - 88 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Physical inactivity has been well documented as a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. Previous studies measured the level of physical activity either with questionnaires or with direct measurements of maximum oxygen uptake. However, questionnaires are patient-report measures, and methods for obtaining direct maximum oxygen uptake measurements often are not available clinically. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether clinical measurement of health-related physical fitness with a simple test battery can predict insulin resistance, a precursor of type 2 diabetes, in people at risk for diabetes. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 151 volunteers with at least one diabetes risk factor (overweight, hypertension, dyslipidemia, family history, impaired glucose tolerance, gestational diabetes, or delivering a baby weighing more than 4.0 kg) were recruited. Insulin resistance (as determined with the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), physical fitness (including body composition, as determined with the body mass index and waist circumference), muscle strength (handgrip strength [force-generating capacity]), muscle endurance (sit-up test), flexibility (sit-and-reach test), and cardiorespiratory endurance (step test) were measured, and a physical activity questionnaire was administered. Backward regression analysis was used to build the prediction models for insulin resistance from components of physical fitness and physical activity. RESULTS: Body mass index, muscle strength, and cardiorespiratory fitness predicted HOMA-IR in men (adjusted R(2)=.264). In women, age, waist circumference, and cardiorespiratory fitness were the predictors of HOMA-IR (adjusted R(2)=.438). DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Clinical measures of physical fitness can predict insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes. The findings support the validity of clinical measures of physical fitness for predicting insulin resistance in people at risk for diabetes. SN - 1538-6724 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18801854/Clinical_measures_of_physical_fitness_predict_insulin_resistance_in_people_at_risk_for_diabetes_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ptj/article-lookup/doi/10.2522/ptj.20080064 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -