Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Do early-life insults contribute to the late-life development of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases?

Abstract

How early-life events "set the stage" for adult disease has emerged as a research focus. Historically, the epidemiology of disease risk factors has centered on adult life, with little scrutiny of early-life events. Here we review the concept that events in early life may contribute to late-life neurodegenerative disease development, with a focus on Parkinson disease (PD) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Suspect events in early life include infections, stress, poor nutrition, and environmental factors such as chemical and pesticide exposure. Adiposity appears to contribute to both PD and AD; and because early-life events contribute to the development of obesity, linkages may exist between early determinants of obesity and the subsequent development of these neurologic diseases. Many now suggest a life-course approach for determining the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors in any chronic disease. This requires determining when during the life course that a given exposure has its greatest effect and how exposures may accumulate over the life span. The data for PD and AD suggest that a number of insults occurring early in life may lead or contribute to these diseases. More definitive knowledge of the key risk factors involved will be needed to implement intervention and preventative strategies early in life to dampen or prevent any adverse late-life outcomes.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA. dum6@cdc.gov

    Source

    Metabolism: clinical and experimental 57 Suppl 2: 2008 Oct pg S44-9

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Alzheimer Disease
    Female
    Humans
    Life Change Events
    Parkinson Disease
    Pregnancy
    Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects
    Risk Factors
    Stress, Physiological
    Time Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18803966

    Citation

    Miller, Diane B., and James P. O'Callaghan. "Do Early-life Insults Contribute to the Late-life Development of Parkinson and Alzheimer Diseases?" Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 57 Suppl 2, 2008, pp. S44-9.
    Miller DB, O'Callaghan JP. Do early-life insults contribute to the late-life development of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases? Metab Clin Exp. 2008;57 Suppl 2:S44-9.
    Miller, D. B., & O'Callaghan, J. P. (2008). Do early-life insults contribute to the late-life development of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases? Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 57 Suppl 2, pp. S44-9. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2008.07.011.
    Miller DB, O'Callaghan JP. Do Early-life Insults Contribute to the Late-life Development of Parkinson and Alzheimer Diseases. Metab Clin Exp. 2008;57 Suppl 2:S44-9. PubMed PMID: 18803966.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Do early-life insults contribute to the late-life development of Parkinson and Alzheimer diseases? AU - Miller,Diane B, AU - O'Callaghan,James P, PY - 2008/9/23/pubmed PY - 2008/10/16/medline PY - 2008/9/23/entrez SP - S44 EP - 9 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metab. Clin. Exp. VL - 57 Suppl 2 N2 - How early-life events "set the stage" for adult disease has emerged as a research focus. Historically, the epidemiology of disease risk factors has centered on adult life, with little scrutiny of early-life events. Here we review the concept that events in early life may contribute to late-life neurodegenerative disease development, with a focus on Parkinson disease (PD) and Alzheimer disease (AD). Suspect events in early life include infections, stress, poor nutrition, and environmental factors such as chemical and pesticide exposure. Adiposity appears to contribute to both PD and AD; and because early-life events contribute to the development of obesity, linkages may exist between early determinants of obesity and the subsequent development of these neurologic diseases. Many now suggest a life-course approach for determining the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors in any chronic disease. This requires determining when during the life course that a given exposure has its greatest effect and how exposures may accumulate over the life span. The data for PD and AD suggest that a number of insults occurring early in life may lead or contribute to these diseases. More definitive knowledge of the key risk factors involved will be needed to implement intervention and preventative strategies early in life to dampen or prevent any adverse late-life outcomes. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18803966/Do_early_life_insults_contribute_to_the_late_life_development_of_Parkinson_and_Alzheimer_diseases L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(08)00251-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -