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Influenza vaccination among Canadians with chronic respiratory disease.
Respir Med 2009; 103(1):50-8RM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purposes of this study were to estimate the prevalence of recent influenza vaccination, to identify sociodemographic risk factors and reasons for non-vaccination, and to examine the association between influenza vaccination and respiratory medication use, among individuals with asthma and COPD in Canada.

METHODS

Data from the 2003 Statistics Canada Canadian Community Health Survey (n=134,072, age 12-80+ years) were analyzed. All data were based on self-report.

RESULTS

An estimated 36.3% and 47.9% of individuals with asthma and COPD, respectively, were immunized for influenza within the last year in 2003. These vaccination rates were relatively lower than those seen with other non-respiratory health conditions. Respondents thinking that influenza vaccination was not necessary was the most frequent reason cited for non-vaccination among individuals with asthma and COPD. Men, non-Ontarians, younger age groups, current smokers, and those without a family doctor were less likely to be vaccinated among individuals with asthma and COPD. After controlling for potential sociodemographic confounders, among individuals with asthma, those vaccinated for influenza had significantly greater odds of using inhalers/nebulizers (OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.3-2.4). No other significant medication use associations were observed among individuals with asthma and COPD.

CONCLUSIONS

Recent self-reported influenza vaccination rates among individuals with asthma and COPD were relatively low. Influenza vaccination was not associated with decreased respiratory medication use among individuals with asthma and COPD, suggesting that vaccination may not help prevent exacerbations. More research is needed to fully clarify the role of influenza vaccination in chronic respiratory disease, particularly asthma, to justify policies of mass-immunization.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Respirology, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Medical Sciences Building, 1 King's College Circle, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. nick.vozoris@utoronto.caNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18818066

Citation

Vozoris, Nicholas T., and M Diane Lougheed. "Influenza Vaccination Among Canadians With Chronic Respiratory Disease." Respiratory Medicine, vol. 103, no. 1, 2009, pp. 50-8.
Vozoris NT, Lougheed MD. Influenza vaccination among Canadians with chronic respiratory disease. Respir Med. 2009;103(1):50-8.
Vozoris, N. T., & Lougheed, M. D. (2009). Influenza vaccination among Canadians with chronic respiratory disease. Respiratory Medicine, 103(1), pp. 50-8. doi:10.1016/j.rmed.2008.08.004.
Vozoris NT, Lougheed MD. Influenza Vaccination Among Canadians With Chronic Respiratory Disease. Respir Med. 2009;103(1):50-8. PubMed PMID: 18818066.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influenza vaccination among Canadians with chronic respiratory disease. AU - Vozoris,Nicholas T, AU - Lougheed,M Diane, Y1 - 2008/09/24/ PY - 2008/02/05/received PY - 2008/07/12/revised PY - 2008/08/08/accepted PY - 2008/9/27/pubmed PY - 2009/2/10/medline PY - 2008/9/27/entrez SP - 50 EP - 8 JF - Respiratory medicine JO - Respir Med VL - 103 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purposes of this study were to estimate the prevalence of recent influenza vaccination, to identify sociodemographic risk factors and reasons for non-vaccination, and to examine the association between influenza vaccination and respiratory medication use, among individuals with asthma and COPD in Canada. METHODS: Data from the 2003 Statistics Canada Canadian Community Health Survey (n=134,072, age 12-80+ years) were analyzed. All data were based on self-report. RESULTS: An estimated 36.3% and 47.9% of individuals with asthma and COPD, respectively, were immunized for influenza within the last year in 2003. These vaccination rates were relatively lower than those seen with other non-respiratory health conditions. Respondents thinking that influenza vaccination was not necessary was the most frequent reason cited for non-vaccination among individuals with asthma and COPD. Men, non-Ontarians, younger age groups, current smokers, and those without a family doctor were less likely to be vaccinated among individuals with asthma and COPD. After controlling for potential sociodemographic confounders, among individuals with asthma, those vaccinated for influenza had significantly greater odds of using inhalers/nebulizers (OR=1.8, 95% CI=1.3-2.4). No other significant medication use associations were observed among individuals with asthma and COPD. CONCLUSIONS: Recent self-reported influenza vaccination rates among individuals with asthma and COPD were relatively low. Influenza vaccination was not associated with decreased respiratory medication use among individuals with asthma and COPD, suggesting that vaccination may not help prevent exacerbations. More research is needed to fully clarify the role of influenza vaccination in chronic respiratory disease, particularly asthma, to justify policies of mass-immunization. SN - 1532-3064 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18818066/Influenza_vaccination_among_Canadians_with_chronic_respiratory_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0954-6111(08)00295-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -