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Multiple micronutrient deficiencies persist during early childhood in Mongolia.

Abstract

Data on the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in children in Mongolia is limited. We therefore determined the prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), and deficiencies of iron, folate, vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin D among young Mongolian children. Anthropometry and non-fasting morning blood samples were collected from 243 children aged 6-36 months from 4 districts in Ulaanbaatar and 4 rural capitols for haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin, folate, retinol, zinc, selenium, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) assays. Children with alpha-1-glycoprotein >1.2mg/L (n=27) indicative of chronic infection were excluded, except for folate, selenium, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D assays. Of the children 14.5% were stunted and none were wasted. Zn deficiency (serum Zn <9.9 micromol/L) had the highest prevalence (74%), followed by vitamin D deficiency 61% (serum 25-OHD<25 nmol/L). The prevalence of anaemia (24%) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) (16%) was lower, with the oldest children (24-36 mos) at lowest risk. Twenty one percent of the children had low iron stores, and 33% had vitamin A deficiencies (serum retinol < 0.70 micromol/L), even though two thirds had received vitamin A supplements. Serum selenium values were low, perhaps associated with low soil selenium concentrations. In contrast, no children in Ulaanbaatar and only 4% in the provincial capitols had low serum folate values (<6.8 nmol/L). Regional differences (p<0.05) existed for anaemia, deficiencies of vitamin A, folate, and selenium, but not for zinc or IDA. Of the children, 78% were at risk of > or = two coexisting micronutrient deficiencies emphasizing the need for multimicronutrient interventions in Mongolia.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Human Nutrition, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

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    MeSH

    Anemia
    Anemia, Iron-Deficiency
    Anthropometry
    Body Height
    Child Nutrition Disorders
    Child, Preschool
    Comorbidity
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Demography
    Female
    Humans
    Infant
    Male
    Micronutrients
    Mongolia
    Nutrition Assessment
    Nutritional Status
    Selenium
    Vitamin A Deficiency
    Vitamin D Deficiency
    Zinc

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18818163

    Citation

    Lander, Rebecca L., et al. "Multiple Micronutrient Deficiencies Persist During Early Childhood in Mongolia." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 17, no. 3, 2008, pp. 429-40.
    Lander RL, Enkhjargal T, Batjargal J, et al. Multiple micronutrient deficiencies persist during early childhood in Mongolia. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(3):429-40.
    Lander, R. L., Enkhjargal, T., Batjargal, J., Bailey, K. B., Diouf, S., Green, T. J., ... Gibson, R. S. (2008). Multiple micronutrient deficiencies persist during early childhood in Mongolia. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 17(3), pp. 429-40.
    Lander RL, et al. Multiple Micronutrient Deficiencies Persist During Early Childhood in Mongolia. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2008;17(3):429-40. PubMed PMID: 18818163.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Multiple micronutrient deficiencies persist during early childhood in Mongolia. AU - Lander,Rebecca L, AU - Enkhjargal,Tserennadmid, AU - Batjargal,Jamiyan, AU - Bailey,Karl B, AU - Diouf,Sarah, AU - Green,Timothy J, AU - Skeaff,C Murray, AU - Gibson,Rosalind S, PY - 2008/9/27/pubmed PY - 2009/1/29/medline PY - 2008/9/27/entrez SP - 429 EP - 40 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - Data on the prevalence of micronutrient deficiencies in children in Mongolia is limited. We therefore determined the prevalence of anaemia, iron deficiency anaemia (IDA), and deficiencies of iron, folate, vitamin A, zinc, selenium, and vitamin D among young Mongolian children. Anthropometry and non-fasting morning blood samples were collected from 243 children aged 6-36 months from 4 districts in Ulaanbaatar and 4 rural capitols for haemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin, folate, retinol, zinc, selenium, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) assays. Children with alpha-1-glycoprotein >1.2mg/L (n=27) indicative of chronic infection were excluded, except for folate, selenium, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D assays. Of the children 14.5% were stunted and none were wasted. Zn deficiency (serum Zn <9.9 micromol/L) had the highest prevalence (74%), followed by vitamin D deficiency 61% (serum 25-OHD<25 nmol/L). The prevalence of anaemia (24%) and iron deficiency anaemia (IDA) (16%) was lower, with the oldest children (24-36 mos) at lowest risk. Twenty one percent of the children had low iron stores, and 33% had vitamin A deficiencies (serum retinol < 0.70 micromol/L), even though two thirds had received vitamin A supplements. Serum selenium values were low, perhaps associated with low soil selenium concentrations. In contrast, no children in Ulaanbaatar and only 4% in the provincial capitols had low serum folate values (<6.8 nmol/L). Regional differences (p<0.05) existed for anaemia, deficiencies of vitamin A, folate, and selenium, but not for zinc or IDA. Of the children, 78% were at risk of > or = two coexisting micronutrient deficiencies emphasizing the need for multimicronutrient interventions in Mongolia. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18818163/Multiple_micronutrient_deficiencies_persist_during_early_childhood_in_Mongolia_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/17/3/429.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -