Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sources of supplemental iron among breastfed infants during the first year of life.
Pediatrics. 2008 Oct; 122 Suppl 2:S98-104.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Primary prevention of iron deficiency requires adequate iron intake. Although recommendations exist to promote adequate intake of iron among infants through iron-rich foods and iron supplements, few studies have examined adherence to these recommendations. Our objectives were to describe the consumption of iron-rich foods, oral iron supplements, and iron-fortified formula among US infants and to assess adherence to iron-intake recommendations.

METHODS

We analyzed data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II, a longitudinal study of mothers and infants followed from late pregnancy through the first year of their infant's life. Mothers completed near-monthly questionnaires that assessed how frequently they fed their infants breast milk, formula, infant cereals, and meats in the previous 7 days and whether their infants were given an oral iron supplement > or = 3 times per week during the previous 2 weeks. We examined use of iron-fortified formula among infants who consumed formula; intake of cereal, meat, oral iron supplements, and formula among infants consuming any breast milk; and whether 6-month-old breastfed and mixed-fed (breast milk and formula) infants consumed sources of supplemental iron with recommended frequency.

RESULTS

At 6 months of age, 18% of the term breastfed and mixed-fed infants had not received infant cereal or meat in the previous 7 days, and 15% had not received infant cereal, meat, regular iron supplements, or formula; among solely breastfed infants, 23% had not received infant cereal, meat, or regular iron supplements. Fifty-eight percent of the mixed-fed infants and 70% of the solely breastfed infants received < 2 daily servings of infant cereal, meat, or formula combined and did not receive oral iron supplements > or = 3 times per week. Among preterm breastfed and mixed-fed infants, none received oral iron supplements > or = 3 times per week before 3 months of age, 2% received them at 3 months, and 13% received them at 10.5 months.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings indicate that recommendations regarding iron intake among breastfed infants are not being followed by a substantial proportion of mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Epidemic Intelligence Service, Office of Career and Workforce Development, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. ddee@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18829838

Citation

Dee, Deborah L., et al. "Sources of Supplemental Iron Among Breastfed Infants During the First Year of Life." Pediatrics, vol. 122 Suppl 2, 2008, pp. S98-104.
Dee DL, Sharma AJ, Cogswell ME, et al. Sources of supplemental iron among breastfed infants during the first year of life. Pediatrics. 2008;122 Suppl 2:S98-104.
Dee, D. L., Sharma, A. J., Cogswell, M. E., Grummer-Strawn, L. M., Fein, S. B., & Scanlon, K. S. (2008). Sources of supplemental iron among breastfed infants during the first year of life. Pediatrics, 122 Suppl 2, S98-104. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2008-1315m
Dee DL, et al. Sources of Supplemental Iron Among Breastfed Infants During the First Year of Life. Pediatrics. 2008;122 Suppl 2:S98-104. PubMed PMID: 18829838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sources of supplemental iron among breastfed infants during the first year of life. AU - Dee,Deborah L, AU - Sharma,Andrea J, AU - Cogswell,Mary E, AU - Grummer-Strawn,Laurence M, AU - Fein,Sara B, AU - Scanlon,Kelley S, PY - 2008/10/10/pubmed PY - 2008/11/13/medline PY - 2008/10/10/entrez SP - S98 EP - 104 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 122 Suppl 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Primary prevention of iron deficiency requires adequate iron intake. Although recommendations exist to promote adequate intake of iron among infants through iron-rich foods and iron supplements, few studies have examined adherence to these recommendations. Our objectives were to describe the consumption of iron-rich foods, oral iron supplements, and iron-fortified formula among US infants and to assess adherence to iron-intake recommendations. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II, a longitudinal study of mothers and infants followed from late pregnancy through the first year of their infant's life. Mothers completed near-monthly questionnaires that assessed how frequently they fed their infants breast milk, formula, infant cereals, and meats in the previous 7 days and whether their infants were given an oral iron supplement > or = 3 times per week during the previous 2 weeks. We examined use of iron-fortified formula among infants who consumed formula; intake of cereal, meat, oral iron supplements, and formula among infants consuming any breast milk; and whether 6-month-old breastfed and mixed-fed (breast milk and formula) infants consumed sources of supplemental iron with recommended frequency. RESULTS: At 6 months of age, 18% of the term breastfed and mixed-fed infants had not received infant cereal or meat in the previous 7 days, and 15% had not received infant cereal, meat, regular iron supplements, or formula; among solely breastfed infants, 23% had not received infant cereal, meat, or regular iron supplements. Fifty-eight percent of the mixed-fed infants and 70% of the solely breastfed infants received < 2 daily servings of infant cereal, meat, or formula combined and did not receive oral iron supplements > or = 3 times per week. Among preterm breastfed and mixed-fed infants, none received oral iron supplements > or = 3 times per week before 3 months of age, 2% received them at 3 months, and 13% received them at 10.5 months. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that recommendations regarding iron intake among breastfed infants are not being followed by a substantial proportion of mothers. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18829838/Sources_of_supplemental_iron_among_breastfed_infants_during_the_first_year_of_life_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=18829838 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -