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Lead levels in women at delivery at the Muhimbili National Hospital: a public health problem.
J Trop Pediatr. 2009 Apr; 55(2):138-9.JT

Abstract

Lead poisoning is a global health problem but unrecognized in African countries. Umbilical Cord Lead levels can be used to determine community exposure to lead. At delivery, 150 women were recruited for cord blood lead. A prevalence of 10% beyond the accepted range was found. Cord blood levels ranged from 0.1-18.1 microg/dl, with a mean of 4.1 microg/dl. There was no association between lead levels and pregnancy outcomes in terms of low birth weight and pre-term delivery. There was a weak association between lead poisoning and living in a painted house and use of tap water (OR = 1.4). There was no association between lead poisoning and use of facial cosmetics. Living near heavy traffic was more associated with increased cord blood lead levels.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18836197

Citation

Azayo, Mary M., et al. "Lead Levels in Women at Delivery at the Muhimbili National Hospital: a Public Health Problem." Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, vol. 55, no. 2, 2009, pp. 138-9.
Azayo MM, Manji K, Kalokola F. Lead levels in women at delivery at the Muhimbili National Hospital: a public health problem. J Trop Pediatr. 2009;55(2):138-9.
Azayo, M. M., Manji, K., & Kalokola, F. (2009). Lead levels in women at delivery at the Muhimbili National Hospital: a public health problem. Journal of Tropical Pediatrics, 55(2), 138-9. https://doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmn085
Azayo MM, Manji K, Kalokola F. Lead Levels in Women at Delivery at the Muhimbili National Hospital: a Public Health Problem. J Trop Pediatr. 2009;55(2):138-9. PubMed PMID: 18836197.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lead levels in women at delivery at the Muhimbili National Hospital: a public health problem. AU - Azayo,Mary M, AU - Manji,Karim, AU - Kalokola,Festus, Y1 - 2008/10/04/ PY - 2008/10/7/pubmed PY - 2009/4/30/medline PY - 2008/10/7/entrez SP - 138 EP - 9 JF - Journal of tropical pediatrics JO - J Trop Pediatr VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - Lead poisoning is a global health problem but unrecognized in African countries. Umbilical Cord Lead levels can be used to determine community exposure to lead. At delivery, 150 women were recruited for cord blood lead. A prevalence of 10% beyond the accepted range was found. Cord blood levels ranged from 0.1-18.1 microg/dl, with a mean of 4.1 microg/dl. There was no association between lead levels and pregnancy outcomes in terms of low birth weight and pre-term delivery. There was a weak association between lead poisoning and living in a painted house and use of tap water (OR = 1.4). There was no association between lead poisoning and use of facial cosmetics. Living near heavy traffic was more associated with increased cord blood lead levels. SN - 1465-3664 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18836197/Lead_levels_in_women_at_delivery_at_the_Muhimbili_National_Hospital:_a_public_health_problem_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/tropej/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/tropej/fmn085 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -