Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Factors associated with depression in Norwegian nursing homes.
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Apr; 24(4):417-25.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Depression among patients in nursing homes is frequent and apparently underdiagnosed. Because depression is associated with negative outcomes, identification of groups at risk would improve the diagnosis and potentially improve the prognosis.

AIM

To confirm or reject the hypothesis that depression in nursing homes is associated with worse medical health, cognitive and functional impairment.

METHODS

A sample of 902 randomly selected nursing-home patients was assessed using the Cornell Scale, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) the Self-Maintenance Scale and a general measurement of medical health. Additionally, information was collected from the patients' records. A multiple linear regression was performed with the Cornell Scale total score, and mood and non-mood subscale scores as the dependent variables.

RESULTS

In the adjusted analysis, depression according to the Cornell total score was associated with worse medical health (strongest) and worse cognitive impairment (p < 0.001), but not with worse functional impairment. The mood subscale score was associated with worse medical health (strongest, p = 0.001), pulmonary diseases (p = 0.007), being unmarried (p = 0.019) and female gender (p = 0.022), but not with worse cognitive impairment. The non-mood subscale score was correlated with cognitive impairment (strongest, p < 0.001), worse medical health (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.001), digestive diseases (p = 0.033) and not having suffered from stroke (p = 0.045).

CONCLUSION

Our hypothesis was partially confirmed. Worse general medical health was the strongest factor associated with depression, followed by degree of cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment was not associated with the mood subscale score, but was the strongest correlate for the non-mood symptoms of the Cornell Scale.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Norwegian Centre for Dementia Research, Centre for Ageing and Health, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ullevaal University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. maria.barca@aldringoghelse.noNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18836988

Citation

Barca, Maria Lage, et al. "Factors Associated With Depression in Norwegian Nursing Homes." International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, vol. 24, no. 4, 2009, pp. 417-25.
Barca ML, Selbaek G, Laks J, et al. Factors associated with depression in Norwegian nursing homes. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009;24(4):417-25.
Barca, M. L., Selbaek, G., Laks, J., & Engedal, K. (2009). Factors associated with depression in Norwegian nursing homes. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 24(4), 417-25. https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2139
Barca ML, et al. Factors Associated With Depression in Norwegian Nursing Homes. Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009;24(4):417-25. PubMed PMID: 18836988.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors associated with depression in Norwegian nursing homes. AU - Barca,Maria Lage, AU - Selbaek,Geir, AU - Laks,Jerson, AU - Engedal,Knut, PY - 2008/10/7/pubmed PY - 2010/3/17/medline PY - 2008/10/7/entrez SP - 417 EP - 25 JF - International journal of geriatric psychiatry JO - Int J Geriatr Psychiatry VL - 24 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Depression among patients in nursing homes is frequent and apparently underdiagnosed. Because depression is associated with negative outcomes, identification of groups at risk would improve the diagnosis and potentially improve the prognosis. AIM: To confirm or reject the hypothesis that depression in nursing homes is associated with worse medical health, cognitive and functional impairment. METHODS: A sample of 902 randomly selected nursing-home patients was assessed using the Cornell Scale, the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR) the Self-Maintenance Scale and a general measurement of medical health. Additionally, information was collected from the patients' records. A multiple linear regression was performed with the Cornell Scale total score, and mood and non-mood subscale scores as the dependent variables. RESULTS: In the adjusted analysis, depression according to the Cornell total score was associated with worse medical health (strongest) and worse cognitive impairment (p < 0.001), but not with worse functional impairment. The mood subscale score was associated with worse medical health (strongest, p = 0.001), pulmonary diseases (p = 0.007), being unmarried (p = 0.019) and female gender (p = 0.022), but not with worse cognitive impairment. The non-mood subscale score was correlated with cognitive impairment (strongest, p < 0.001), worse medical health (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.001), digestive diseases (p = 0.033) and not having suffered from stroke (p = 0.045). CONCLUSION: Our hypothesis was partially confirmed. Worse general medical health was the strongest factor associated with depression, followed by degree of cognitive impairment. Cognitive impairment was not associated with the mood subscale score, but was the strongest correlate for the non-mood symptoms of the Cornell Scale. SN - 1099-1166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18836988/Factors_associated_with_depression_in_Norwegian_nursing_homes_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/gps.2139 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -