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Insulin-like growth factors, their binding proteins, and prostate cancer risk: analysis of individual patient data from 12 prospective studies.
Ann Intern Med 2008; 149(7):461-71, W83-8AIM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Some, but not all, published results have shown an association between circulating blood levels of some insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the subsequent risk for prostate cancer.

PURPOSE

To assess the association between levels of IGFs and IGFBPs and the subsequent risk for prostate cancer.

DATA SOURCES

Studies identified in PubMed, Web of Science, and CancerLit.

STUDY SELECTION

The principal investigators of all studies that published data on circulating concentrations of sex steroids, IGFs, or IGFBPs and prostate cancer risk using prospectively collected blood samples were invited to collaborate.

DATA EXTRACTION

Investigators provided individual participant data on circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-II, and IGFBP-III and participant characteristics to a central data set in Oxford, United Kingdom.

DATA SYNTHESIS

The study included data on 3700 men with prostate cancer and 5200 control participants. On average, case patients were 61.5 years of age at blood collection and received a diagnosis of prostate cancer 5 years after blood collection. The greater the serum IGF-I concentration, the greater the subsequent risk for prostate cancer (odds ratio [OR] in the highest vs. lowest quintile, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.19 to 1.60]; P < 0.001 for trend). Neither IGF-II nor IGFBP-II concentrations were associated with prostate cancer risk, but statistical power was limited. Insulin-like growth factor I and IGFBP-III were correlated (r = 0.58), and although IGFBP-III concentration seemed to be associated with prostate cancer risk, this was secondary to its association with IGF-I levels. Insulin-like growth factor I concentrations seemed to be more positively associated with low-grade than high-grade disease; otherwise, the association between IGFs and IGFBPs and prostate cancer risk had no statistically significant heterogeneity related to stage or grade of disease, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age and year of diagnosis, prostate-specific antigen level at recruitment, body mass index, smoking, or alcohol intake.

LIMITATIONS

Insulin-like growth factor concentrations were measured in only 1 sample for each participant, and the laboratory methods to measure IGFs differed in each study. Not all patients had disease stage or grade information, and the diagnosis of prostate cancer may differ among the studies.

CONCLUSION

High circulating IGF-I concentrations are associated with a moderately increased risk for prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford OX3 7LF, United Kingdom. andrew.roddam@ceu.ox.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18838726

Citation

Roddam, Andrew W., et al. "Insulin-like Growth Factors, Their Binding Proteins, and Prostate Cancer Risk: Analysis of Individual Patient Data From 12 Prospective Studies." Annals of Internal Medicine, vol. 149, no. 7, 2008, pp. 461-71, W83-8.
Roddam AW, Allen NE, Appleby P, et al. Insulin-like growth factors, their binding proteins, and prostate cancer risk: analysis of individual patient data from 12 prospective studies. Ann Intern Med. 2008;149(7):461-71, W83-8.
Roddam, A. W., Allen, N. E., Appleby, P., Key, T. J., Ferrucci, L., Carter, H. B., ... Galan, P. (2008). Insulin-like growth factors, their binding proteins, and prostate cancer risk: analysis of individual patient data from 12 prospective studies. Annals of Internal Medicine, 149(7), pp. 461-71, W83-8.
Roddam AW, et al. Insulin-like Growth Factors, Their Binding Proteins, and Prostate Cancer Risk: Analysis of Individual Patient Data From 12 Prospective Studies. Ann Intern Med. 2008 Oct 7;149(7):461-71, W83-8. PubMed PMID: 18838726.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Insulin-like growth factors, their binding proteins, and prostate cancer risk: analysis of individual patient data from 12 prospective studies. AU - Roddam,Andrew W, AU - Allen,Naomi E, AU - Appleby,Paul, AU - Key,Timothy J, AU - Ferrucci,Luigi, AU - Carter,H Ballentine, AU - Metter,E Jeffrey, AU - Chen,Chu, AU - Weiss,Noel S, AU - Fitzpatrick,Annette, AU - Hsing,Ann W, AU - Lacey,James V,Jr AU - Helzlsouer,Kathy, AU - Rinaldi,Sabina, AU - Riboli,Elio, AU - Kaaks,Rudolf, AU - Janssen,Joop A M J L, AU - Wildhagen,Mark F, AU - Schröder,Fritz H, AU - Platz,Elizabeth A, AU - Pollak,Michael, AU - Giovannucci,Edward, AU - Schaefer,Catherine, AU - Quesenberry,Charles P,Jr AU - Vogelman,Joseph H, AU - Severi,Gianluca, AU - English,Dallas R, AU - Giles,Graham G, AU - Stattin,Pär, AU - Hallmans,Göran, AU - Johansson,Mattias, AU - Chan,June M, AU - Gann,Peter, AU - Oliver,Steven E, AU - Holly,Jeff M, AU - Donovan,Jenny, AU - Meyer,François, AU - Bairati,Isabelle, AU - Galan,Pilar, PY - 2008/10/8/pubmed PY - 2008/10/24/medline PY - 2008/10/8/entrez SP - 461-71, W83-8 JF - Annals of internal medicine JO - Ann. Intern. Med. VL - 149 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Some, but not all, published results have shown an association between circulating blood levels of some insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBPs) and the subsequent risk for prostate cancer. PURPOSE: To assess the association between levels of IGFs and IGFBPs and the subsequent risk for prostate cancer. DATA SOURCES: Studies identified in PubMed, Web of Science, and CancerLit. STUDY SELECTION: The principal investigators of all studies that published data on circulating concentrations of sex steroids, IGFs, or IGFBPs and prostate cancer risk using prospectively collected blood samples were invited to collaborate. DATA EXTRACTION: Investigators provided individual participant data on circulating concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-II, and IGFBP-III and participant characteristics to a central data set in Oxford, United Kingdom. DATA SYNTHESIS: The study included data on 3700 men with prostate cancer and 5200 control participants. On average, case patients were 61.5 years of age at blood collection and received a diagnosis of prostate cancer 5 years after blood collection. The greater the serum IGF-I concentration, the greater the subsequent risk for prostate cancer (odds ratio [OR] in the highest vs. lowest quintile, 1.38 [95% CI, 1.19 to 1.60]; P < 0.001 for trend). Neither IGF-II nor IGFBP-II concentrations were associated with prostate cancer risk, but statistical power was limited. Insulin-like growth factor I and IGFBP-III were correlated (r = 0.58), and although IGFBP-III concentration seemed to be associated with prostate cancer risk, this was secondary to its association with IGF-I levels. Insulin-like growth factor I concentrations seemed to be more positively associated with low-grade than high-grade disease; otherwise, the association between IGFs and IGFBPs and prostate cancer risk had no statistically significant heterogeneity related to stage or grade of disease, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age and year of diagnosis, prostate-specific antigen level at recruitment, body mass index, smoking, or alcohol intake. LIMITATIONS: Insulin-like growth factor concentrations were measured in only 1 sample for each participant, and the laboratory methods to measure IGFs differed in each study. Not all patients had disease stage or grade information, and the diagnosis of prostate cancer may differ among the studies. CONCLUSION: High circulating IGF-I concentrations are associated with a moderately increased risk for prostate cancer. SN - 1539-3704 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18838726/full_citation L2 - https://www.annals.org/article.aspx?volume=149&amp;issue=7&amp;page=461 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -